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Who here stacks their aquariums to save on floorspace? I already have three 10g on a multi-level stand; my second multi level stand is planned for either 20L or 29g. I am blessed to have a husband who supports my hobby as long as the floor can support the weight!

Right now only the 10s and my 75 gallon are running, but I have a 40B waiting too.

I guess my question is what size aquariums are the best to stack between safety and versatility in ordinary housing (not concrete)? 29s? 40Bs? 20Ls? 55? I want to choose my tank sizes ahead of time so I can design my stands/cabinet around that particular tank size and its matching equipment.

My plant and species interests are pretty varied, so pretty much any opinion is welcome. The older I get the more I experiment and find new loves/challenges.


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I size my tanks to fit the fish needs and then adapt the stand. I see the feeling but then I put the use of the tank before the use of the floor space. Depends on what fish will be in the tanks for my decisions.
What will you being using the tanks for? Growout tanks can be small but as the fish get bigger, bigger tanks are needed for good growing.
One big point is to remember to leave space for ease of working in the tank below others. nothing much worse than finding you have a nice item but can't get it into the tank for the tight space
 

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Every one of my tanks are in a rack of tanks. And yes the lowest tanks are a bit of a pain to drain. But stacking is the only way I will be able to get all 60+ tanks in the fish house.
 

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I am building new stands to be able to stack more of mine. Making sure there is plenty of working space for the lower tanks.

Currently stacked is a row of the sturdy garage shelving sold by the big box stores. Replaced all the particle board shelves with outdoor plywood, painted. All these are just 2 tanks high with space to work the lower tanks, and room for lights. The lower tanks are high enough to siphon reasonably.
4 x 29 gal.
5 x 20 gal.
1 x 20 long
2 x 15 gal.
3 x 10 gal.
1 x 3 gal.
 

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Most important part of the stack... don't place the bottom ones too low, or you will have nightmares siphoning off anything...seems like you got that.
I would suggest using the tanks that give you the most volume for the least height in order to allow more rows in your rack.
Place the larger tanks at the bottom rows, this makes maintenance and removal easier. and potentially allow for less heavy upper shelves and supports.

Start by designing your drainage first.

What is the point to the setup. Display? Breeding? Aquascaping?
 

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I stack 3 gallon plastic tanks w/plexiglass lids directly on top of each other, no stands/racks. The lowest are on a table about 3' from the floor, then there are 2 tanks on top of those making the highest ones about eye level. One thing to note when stacking tanks, especially those of you stacking from the floor up, is that the temperature will generally be about 1 or even 2 degrees Fahrenheit greater per tank level.
 
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