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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am totaly absrobed in this hobby, it is an amazingly fun past time. But right now, my planted aquairum education is pretty spotty, and their are several things about planted aquariums I "should" know, but dont. So I am starting a thread to for my stupid questions.
1. What is the diffrence between a T5, T8 and T12 fixture?
2. What is considered "high lighting" and "low lighting" for a T5, T8 and T12 fixture?
3. What are is the basics of fertilization? (Really broad question I know, but please answere it the best you can. Thanks!)
4. What is are the basics of Co2?

Thanks all! I really appreceate all help with my stupid questions!
(More questions to come!)
 

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I am totaly absrobed in this hobby, it is an amazingly fun past time. But right now, my planted aquairum education is pretty spotty, and their are several things about planted aquariums I "should" know, but dont. So I am starting a thread to for my stupid questions.
1. What is the diffrence between a T5, T8 and T12 fixture?
2. What is considered "high lighting" and "low lighting" for a T5, T8 and T12 fixture?
3. What are is the basics of fertilization? (Really broad question I know, but please answere it the best you can. Thanks!)
4. What is are the basics of Co2?

Thanks all! I really appreceate all help with my stupid questions!
(More questions to come!)
1) The difference is the diameter of the bulb, and the fittings they go in. The bulbs have different light properties, T5 is typically the most light/watt vs. T8 or T12
2) That's kinda fuzzy, but T8 or T12 would be somewhere around 3wpg where the T5 may be closer to 2.5wpg or so.
3) Fertilization is very simple once you do initial calculations. You need to add certain macro's (stuff you need lots of) and micro's (stuff you need a little of). Macro's include K (potassium), NO3 (nitrate), SO4 (sulfate), PO4 (phosphate), and i may have forgotten one or two. The micros include things such as Calcium, Iron, etc. There are multiple ways to dose these ferts (liquid, dry, types of liquid, types of dry), but the most popular seems to be EI, which you can read about on this forum. The biggest rule is not to be intimidated by all the info. It sounds confusing, but you seriously just set up how much of each fert you put in and then put it in.
4)CO2 is something that is necessary as you increase the light over your tank. There is a balance between the CO2, the light, and the ferts that make the plants happy. There are 2 ways to inject CO2, DIY and Pressurized. DIY is super simple. Sugar-water and yeast in a bottle with a tube into the tank. That's it (ok, there are some other necessary things to keep your tank from draining onto the floor and the like, but for theoretical purposes that's it). Pressurized is a little more complex, but not terrible. You pretty much take a tank of CO2 (very high pressure) and run it back down to a lower pressure to be more managable for the tank. You run it through a regulator to take the pressure from hundreds of psi to tens of psi, then run it through a needle valve to take it down to the amount of CO2 needed for your tank. Again, like DIY, i'm leaving out some of the other stuff that you need, but that's the basics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks alot! I havent found many good planted aquarium informational sites or books out there, (other than this forum!) so I have been learning by bits and pieces.
Thanks,
Jake
 
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