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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
I'm a complete newbie at the whole invertebrate thing and I am worried sick about my two red cherry shrimp. I currently have them in a 1 gallon tank, and I bought them two days ago. No ammonia in tank(other testing things arriving in mail soon so currently have no idea..) I acclimated them to the tank, water temp, and everything seemed great(they were very active and eating a lot). One of them even molted! Yesterday I noticed that there was a lot of poop in the tank so I tried removing some of it. Granted the tank isn't great right now as it has only two marimba balls and a fake plant for them to climb on. I tried giving them a piece of algae wafer to eat, and took out remaining bits after 3 hours. The problem is that the tank looks a little milky/cloudy and the shrimp are sitting in one place most of the time. This worries me. Especially now that one of hem is starting to lose color(????:c) I read conflicting opinions on whether you should do a partial water change or let the water calm on its own, so please offer any advice. I think currently my options are that can do a partial water change or try my luck with putting them into the new planted, filtered, and heated tank with my Betta and hoping for the best (would obviously remove them if Betta seems aggressive). Please help me out.
 

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Test ammonia again, I bet there is now some ammonia since it seems you overfed. 2 little shrimp don't need much food at all. The white cloud is a bacterial bloom (and so ammonia levels will rise).

Does the tank have a filter on it? How long has it been running/is it cycled?

If there are ammonia readings and the shrimp are not doing well, then do a water change. The two sides of the topic are, you want the ammonia so that autotrophic bacteria grow to cycle the tank, but if the ammonia levels are too high and dangerous for the shrimp, then a water change is what you want to do so the shrimp won't die.

It is said that shrimp don't like large water changes, so it's iffy whether you should change out much water at once. Maybe you could do smaller water changes multiple times a day.
There are also products like Ammo-Lock and even dosing Seachem Prime can detoxify the ammonia.

Placing them with the betta might be the better option if the betta doesn't harm them, as the larger established tank would be better. Don't add them if they are small enough to fit in his mouth though.


There are a bunch of other things that you should monitor/test for to keep the shrimp and fish in good health, but right now you do not have those. And it seems more apparent that right now the bacterial bloom is the main concern right now. Do some google searches on the shrimp and fish you own and look up their care requirements. That way you know what you should be matching up to keep the livestock in good health.

For now do a water change (match new water temp as close as you can and pour in gently as to not cause more stress on the shrimp), do another water change later on if the cloud is still seen and shrimp are inactive, wait a day or two to feed again, and don't feed so much next time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Currently the tank has no filter and it's at ambient room temperature (which is around 75 degrees). I know this is not ideal...if the Betta doesn't get along with the shrimp I will probably get a filter for the shrimp tank and keep them in there, but currently waiting to see what happens..I will try the multiple water changes a day and see if the water clears up! Will also hold off on feeding. If it doesn't clear by tonight should I attempt to put the shrimp in with the Betta? He is tiny and the shrimp are around 1/2 inch each so they definitely won't fit in his mouth.
 

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Test the ammonia again. If there is now ammonia (let us know the ammonia test result), then I would do something to keep the shrimp from dying.

Prolonged exposure to very low ammonia is also deadly, so the multiple water changes throughout a days time idea is also chancing it. (if the water is still hazy white/cloudy, it's safe to assume there is ammonia).

You mentioned the betta is tiny, in that case, I would see placing the shrimp in the betta tank as the best option. So long as the betta doesn't pester/stress (even though he can't fit them in his mouth) the shrimp to death. Some people have no issues having shrimp with bettas, some do, depends how aggressive the betta is. That way they get out of the ammonia right away and into an established tank.

The betta may pester a bit at first as he is curious/intrigued, that may taper off as he gets acquainted with them.
As long as the betta isn't killing the shrimp, the shrimp still may be better off in the betta tank with no ammonia, than in a smaller uncycled tank with ammonia. They have a better chance surviving in the betta tank especially if they have some places to hide from the betta (plants, decor)


So to recap, if there is ammonia, I would bring the shrimp (both) directly over to the betta tank and observe the betta's interaction. Acting sooner rather than later will increase the likelihood of the shrimp surviving (less exposure to toxic levels of ammonia)

Well, I'm going to get some sleep now. Hope it goes well.

P.S., in the future, you should keep to just one detailed thread rather than multiple threads with more or less info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sorry for spreading it out so much, again. Will stick to one thread next time. And I will be taking your advice. Although when I tested the ammonia this morning, it was at a "safe" level? Which is strange. But I reckon that the test strips are not super accurate (still waiting on that liquid test kit to come). But definitely hazy in there. Will try to place the shrimp into the Betta tank and observe. Fingers crossed! Thanks for all the help!!
 

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Some fish foods talk about not clouding the water. Not sure what causes the cloud in foods that do (maybe precipitation?). I always just thought it broke down/fouled the water quicker, which would create ammonia).

The test strips can be inaccurate, but they do work somewhat. You can use the livestock (shrimp) as indicators, if they are showing signs of distress then you know something is wrong. Dying is the most obvious sign haha, but inactive, not eating, falling on side, losing color, turning milky/white are potential signs that something is making them not feel well, which I assume would be nitrogen/ammonia poisoning (could be something else though, either way, not good and a water change might help).

Algae blooms are green and are safe, even beneficial. But since it's a white cloud, that is usually bacterial bloom which would result in ammonia, which is what I suspect more since the tank in not cycled (NTS, New Tank Syndrome) and you overfed a bit. There is talk about precipitation with water changes, but I don't know too much about that. A dust cloud can come from dirty/unrinsed media or substrate and would be harmless.
 
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