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Discussion Starter #1
So around July 22nd, I was having issues with one of my frogs, and long story short, someone at my LFS told me it was because my water was too soft (yes he was wrong, but I was desperate to help the little guy). I had been using RO water from a different LFS, without remineralizing, as I had no idea that was needed. My pH was like 6.5, 0 GH/KH, 0 nitrites/trates, 0 ammonia.

Well after what he said, I continued with weekly water changes and began slowly introducing dechlorinated tap water into the tank, instead of the RO water.

I live in LA, so my water is (very?) hard. I assumed that by now (mid-August) the water would be "fully hard". However, I just tested it with some API 5-in-1 strips, and it reads the same as when I was using RO water.

What? That doesn't make any sense? I tested my tap water to be sure and yup, 7 pH, 40 KH, 30-60 GH. 0 nitrites, nitrates, ammonia. In addition, weirdly enough, I'm pretty sure the last time I tested it, it was even harder...?

Anyways, what I'm saying is that makes no sense. My aquarium should be all hard water, presumably, after weekly water changes since end of July. It should at least show some change...right?

In addition, I've been fertilizing with ThriveS three times a week for about a month! Shouldn't I see...something?

The frogs, amanos, and otos all seem fine, which wouldn't be the case if some sort of crash happened. The only things I've noticed happening is 1. my water wisteria became brown on the tips and started "disintegrating" almost, I had to remove it and 2. my s. repens and glass have green spot algae on them.

Anyone know what might be going on? For the health of my plants, I think I want to reintroduce RO water, slowly, and cut it with my tap water, maybe 50/50? How would I go about doing that? Also wondering what I should add to get rid of the green spot algae, I've heard you need phosphate?
 

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Hi @AwwShucks,

Sorry, I know zero about keeping frogs but...

Those 5-in-1 strips are the least reliable way to test water. In my own experience, they can be as good as useless. They seem a great idea, very quick and convenient, but....
Get yourself some liquid drop tests and find out what is *really* going on with your water. Suspect you have dodgy results at the moment. The API liquid tests are good.

They do a GH & KH kit, and get the low (standard) range pH too. If you're confident that your tank is fully cycled then great, but otherwise get at least ammonia (safety check!) and nitrate (need a water change?) too.

At the moment I would be worried that you are making decisions based on bad data!

Regards, James
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi @AwwShucks,

Sorry, I know zero about keeping frogs but...

Those 5-in-1 strips are the least reliable way to test water. In my own experience, they can be as good as useless. They seem a great idea, very quick and convenient, but....
Get yourself some liquid drop tests and find out what is *really* going on with your water. Suspect you have dodgy results at the moment. The API liquid tests are good.

They do a GH & KH kit, and get the low (standard) range pH too. If you're confident that your tank is fully cycled then great, but otherwise get at least ammonia (safety check!) and nitrate (need a water change?) too.

At the moment I would be worried that you are making decisions based on bad data!

Regards, James
Thank you :)
I'll definitely be getting those API kits!
 
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