The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm pretty sure that copepods and planaria are what I have, but want a confirmation that they aren't bad.

Planaria - I can't see in nearly as much detail as rain's pictures, but they're just small worm-like creatures. They don't move fast at all.

Copepods - I can't see anything on them, other than a small tail and that their body is a bit larger than the tail.

I would take pictures, but my digital camera's lens won't allow the camera to focus on something so small. I have some CRS in here that I'm hoping will breed... any thoughts?

Also, I've heard things about AquaticMagic, and I'm pretty sure that a combination of those comments, plus this experience will keep me from buying from him again. These came from the subwassertang or whatever that I bought from him. The first day I tied it to a rock and put it in, I started seeing these little things and kind of shrugged it off, maybe that was a mistake?

What can I do? I can put a cory in for a week or so and they should be cleaned up from what I hear, but I don't want to disturb the CRS. However if I need to, I'll do it now, before they start to breed.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
560 Posts
I don't think these critters are much of a risk. I have them too in one tank. You must be carefull not to cross use equipment or all your set-ups might get infected. Like I said have many different micro critters in a 10 with some shrimp. No ill effects and plants look good. Just warn any folks you trade with out of that tank about the micro life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
845 Posts
They don't harm fish/inverts, just make sure not to overfeed. Eventually those critters will die away. Too many planaria are a sign of overfeeding, ie. food, dead plant material, etc. If you take away these factors, you take away their food source = few, if any planaria. Will they disappear entirely? I doubt it; these critters are the natural makeup of aqauriums, ponds, etc. Just keep your eyes on them, they are usually a good indicator of water quality.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
560 Posts
They don't harm fish/inverts, just make sure not to overfeed. Eventually those critters will die away. Too many planaria are a sign of overfeeding, ie. food, dead plant material, etc. If you take away these factors, you take away their food source = few, if any planaria. Will they disappear entirely? I doubt it; these critters are the natural makeup of aqauriums, ponds, etc. Just keep your eyes on them, they are usually a good indicator of water quality.
I agree with this 98% They will never go away without a predator to finish them off. A few will always live no matter how little food is dropped in the tank. Well that is unless you change the water contions of the tank so they can't live. CO2 O.D. is about the best method I can think of next to a fish to eat them. Just enjoy these as a bonus as I do:biggrin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Many invert keepers believe that copepods are a sign of good quality water. Their presence indicates that the water is generally free of toxins and that your tank has a diverse population of micro-organisms which are the natural foods of our dwarf shrimp.

Personally, I get worried when I DON'T see copepods in my tanks. That is when I rush to test for nitrates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,228 Posts
Many invert keepers believe that copepods are a sign of good quality water. Their presence indicates that the water is generally free of toxins and that your tank has a diverse population of micro-organisms which are the natural foods of our dwarf shrimp.

Personally, I get worried when I DON'T see copepods in my tanks. That is when I rush to test for nitrates.
I'm with you 100%! When I don't see something small in my tank I get worried.

Now damslefly young and those types of things are to worry about...

-Andrew
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top