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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For the past year or so, I had what I thought was some sort of thread algae. The main problem was that what ever I would do, it would be unaffected. I gave up forever, just removing as much as I could. I now am pretty confident I have bladderwort, it looks like the pictures I see online, plus it thrives when my plants thrive, not so much when my plants don't thrive.

Is there any way to get rid of this? Manual removal isn't really viable as I have a ton of stems in a small tank (see my 6 gallon journal). I can never get it out of my stems without breaking off small pieces which always come back into larger pieces. It would also be very hard to remove the plants as they have a crazy amount of roots, due to being both low tech, and the fact it's been a very long time. The only thing I can think of outside starting over is trimming all plants to the substrate so I can get to everything. However, that's not appealing in so many ways, plus if I do miss some, I will be right back where I started anyway.

I really can't find much about this and I don't want to restart the tank unless that is a must. I have some rare and hard to find plants as well, I know it will be easier to clean them outside of the tank but I am hesitant to reuse the plants anyways because a single strand may bring it all back to where it is now, over time.

Just wondering if there is any simpler solution I am overlooking. I don't hate it enough to justify a redo but don't enjoy it enough to not try to get rid of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If I recall the solution to this problem was to either start from scratch or live with it.
That's what I am thinking as well. I have tried just about everything and no luck. Just hoping someone has an idea I have not thought of and haven't seen in my searches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just pull it and manage it that way


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I do but after about a year, it's really tucked into some hard to get to places. If I get 99% of it, that 1% always comes back. Right now I am just getting rid of what is obvious, the do a water change which always gets more I can't see, then it keeps it looking good for awhile. I would have to tear up my plants, or likely have to trim them all down to the substrate to really get to every bit of it, something I am not willing to do as it don't bother me to that point.
 

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I have the same problem in my tank and it is 180 gal tank! They are extremely good at keep coming back. I have been fighting this for 3 years... all thanks to one plant that I brought from swap and shop. I going to try again to remove it by removing lots of brushy plants so it can't hide. Then meticulously monitor the tank for two weeks new growth.
 

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Out of curiosity, I did a little Googling.

Seems that for those who want to cultivate it, it's often recommended to use RO/DI water, as it's sensitive to the salt that may be present in other water sources. Carnivorous plants in general are designed for nutrient and mineral poor environments. An Achilles heel, perhaps?

Adjusting my search based on that, I found a single instance where someone used salt in combination with manual removal, and eradicated it from an aquarium:

http://forum.aquatic-gardeners.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=308

It's a very tenuous hope, but hope nonetheless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Out of curiosity, I did a little Googling.

Seems that for those who want to cultivate it, it's often recommended to use RO/DI water, as it's sensitive to the salt that may be present in other water sources. Carnivorous plants in general are designed for nutrient and mineral poor environments. An Achilles heel, perhaps?

Adjusting my search based on that, I found a single instance where someone used salt in combination with manual removal, and eradicated it from an aquarium:

http://forum.aquatic-gardeners.org/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=308

It's a very tenuous hope, but hope nonetheless.
Hmm, that is interest but at the same time, not so conclusive. I am a bit hesitant to start adding salt to the tank as I have never done it. I will have to research this more. I wonder if their is a more friendly way to keep the water parameters good for most my plants but bad for carnivorous plants. I can take my betta out but I am a bit concerned due to his almost 3 years of age, have no other livestock than that.
 

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If I recall the solution to this problem was to either start from scratch or live with it.
This. I'm going to completely rip up my carpet I have in my 20L to eradicate it then source some HC from my Mini M. Luckily that tank hasn't been plagued with it. I got it with some riccia I received a while back....never got rid of it and it's completely invaded my carpet. It wouldn't be so bad if it didn't look like spirogyra.

The salt idea is interesting, though.
 

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Just to let you know, I have an infestation and I noticed a few bits of it in my filter.
It can live without light(carnivorous), so even if you physically remove all of it, it might still be a strand in your filter. In fact, that might be causing a lot of the distribution. It gets chopped up and pushed back out.

Best of luck, but I don't think any normal means are going to rid you of this infestation.
Blackout-useless because of the carnivorous aspect
Nutrient changes to the water-(like you treat algae) useless because of the hardy nature of the plant
Physical removal-nearly impossible because of the small strands and redistribution problem.

Salt actually makes sense. Many plants are sensitive, and given the small size of this plant it might actually take it down. I dont know if it is automatic, but it might be the only change. I am currently salting my aquarium due to an ich infestation. If I notice anything, I will let you know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Salt actually makes sense. Many plants are sensitive, and given the small size of this plant it might actually take it down. I dont know if it is automatic, but it might be the only change. I am currently salting my aquarium due to an ich infestation. If I notice anything, I will let you know.
Definitely let me know. I have given up on it until my Betta passes. It's 3 or 3.5 years old so he may be nearing his end. It sucks because I want to add more plants but know these are going in the trash when I start over. I will not risk transferring it again.
 

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Salt helped, but I didn't go crazy( I have 3 different type of Amazon cats and tetras in there).

I think a higher dose would destroy it
 
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