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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone. Came home and my fish had been gased from my tank becoming empty.. and swear I was unhooking it today to refill! :( Does anyone know of a way to prevent this and what are some strategies you guys do to not have this happen? I had everything correct with the co2 and in balance before this incident.

I had seen a piece of equipment online somewhere that would allow the last of the tank to not spill into my aquarium but I can't find it now and dont remember the name!

I have a milwaukee instruments regulator, co2 tubing, and a 5lb tank. Let me know some suggestions to equipment if ya know. Thanks!
 

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Sorry to hear this, cbessler. Best thing I can suggest is to do a forum search for "end of tank dump" or "EOTD" to get some insights while you wait for people to respond.

Some people say a high quality needle valve should prevent that; or a pH controller. However, I had an Ideal valve on mine and still had an EOTD. So I put on a pH controller to operate my solenoid at a preset pH range. That gets costly so hopefully there are some good suggestions out there.
 

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Just want to make something crystal clear. A needle vale, no matter how much it cost will not stop EOTD. All a needle valve can do is adjust flow after it based on the incoming flow. So if its set at a certain flow and your input pressure rises to 4x's what it normally is (due to eotd) your flow post needle valve will be 4x's the original set amount.

The only thing that can stop EOTD is a dual stage regulator.

The most comprehensive and accurate thread on Dual Stage Regulators on the new when in regard to our application.

http://www.barrreport.com/showthread.php/6470-Dual-Stage-Regulators
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for some input guys. I had read that a lpr would help as well? I believe one can be put inline with my Milwaukee ma957. I heard also that a needle valve gas nothing to do with stopping it.
 

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All this means is that your regulator wasn't functioning properly. Controlling this type of change in pressure is exactly way they make 2-stage regulators.
+1 , agree

That is the purpose of dual stage reg, to prevent the output pressure rise.
 

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Thanks for some input guys. I had read that a lpr would help as well? I believe one can be put inline with my Milwaukee ma957. I heard also that a needle valve gas nothing to do with stopping it.

Or you can weight the tank every month to see how much CO2 you have after your tank pressure has dropped to 500 psi.
 

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To illustrate that a dual stage regulator would prevent EOTD, anyone can test one by plugging the outlet, attaching it to the cylinder, opening the cylinder valve, and increasing the working pressure to any amount. Then close the cylinder.

The tank pressure will read somewhere around 800 psi, and the working pressure will read whatever you set it to (50psi, for example). Even with the cylinder valve off, the two gauges will never decrease so long as there are no leaks.

If you then begin to unscrew the outlet plug so that there is a leak, first the tank pressure will drop. When - and only when - the tank pressure pegs at zero, the working pressure will start to decrease. So long as your needle valve doesn't have a habit of jumping around on its own, the working pressure will never change. Not until the cylinder is completely empty, anyway. Or, I suppose, when the cylinder pressure drops to whatever the working pressure is set at (10-50psi or so). Which is as close to empty as makes no difference.

A pH controller would solve the issue, as well. But a used dual stage regulator is generally cheaper.
 

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Well, I'll fess up to being an idiot yesterday. All the while I was reading "dual stage" I was thinking "dual gauge". So when I mentioned my own regulator didn't prevent EOTD and wasn't a sure-fire way, I was referring to the wrong thing. Mine was a dual gauge. Sheesh. I need a better night sleep and to read more carefully before answering. Sorry about that!
 

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About your EOTD (End of Tank Dump).

Did it SUDDENLY bubble so fast that you can't count?

or

Did it GRADUALLY rise bubble rate?


My Azoo behaves like the type two, I can adjust the needle valve
daily/every other day until the tank empty.

I personally never see type one happen myself but keep hearing about
that from other people.

Without heavy investment into a new regulator my only option would be to weigh my tank after a set period of time?
You should be able to see the pressure drop on the high pressure gauge
without having to weight it.

But I suspect the reason you ask that may be because your EOTD is the
type one that just a little drop of pressure in the tank is all it takes?
 

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Hmm interesting, good info. Without heavy investment into a new regulator my only option would be to weigh my tank after a set period of time?
Like I stated before, as soon as pressure drops it's time to refill, unless you are on top of it and adjust the working pressure daily, still you will only get another week or so out of the tank. The choice is your's.
 

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Hmm interesting, good info. Without heavy investment into a new regulator my only option would be to weigh my tank after a set period of time?

That's what I would do or have to do....:) As soon as the tank pressure drops to 500 psi, go weight your tank. Finding the difference in weights from your current total tank weight to the weight of the tank itself when emptied (the weight of the tank should be stamped on the side of it). The regulator on top if it may add another pound or 2.
 
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