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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I decided to change my substrate a few days ago from an ugly epoxy gravel that had started to fade to some awesome looking caribsea tahitian moon black sand (so my RCS would display full red colouration potential).

So while I was doing this substrate change I decided I would change my tank's look completely. So what I did was siphon about 50% of the water (so I would still have beneficial bacteria) and get rid of the other 50% (and replace it with new water).

So while I was done doing all that... I decided whether or not I would keep the snails in my 5.5gal tank (ponds/ramshorns/MTS) and I decided.. ponds are creepy (repopulated like rabbits too easily) and I don't like ramshorns (and people say they aren't good because they have a big bioload and eat plants). But, I did have a sweet spot for the MTS (they look like cute moving cones) but sadly.. none survived.. no snails I believe reside in the new look of my tank (I wouldn't & would be surprised if I found a few suvivor snails in a few weeks (they are ninjas in Java Moss) but I don't want to assume anything.. so lets just say I wiped them ALL out).

So heres the question: Should I get some MTS at the petstore? because I think I heard having an aerated substrate (espicially sand) is important... Can someone explain me this logic?

and what are the pros of keeping MTS with my RCS (for the purpose of breeding)

and how many MTS should I buy for my 5.5 gal that is holding a LOT of baby RCS? (about 7 adults and 25 babies - probably more than that they move and hide really well)

Replies are greatly appreciated.
 

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Buy one MTS for your 5.5 gallon, because it will be pregnant anyways.

The reason MTS are good for a small grain sand is because small grain sand traps anaerobic pockets, where the bacteria in the sand will create a toxic gas as they consume nitrates. If these pockets aren't frequently disrupted by movement, they'll build up this gas and release it all at once, which basically gasses any inhabitants in the area. Most fish can survive this, but there are some which will die, and in a 5.5 gallon tank, the risk towards livestock will be greater.

The MTS scoot around under the surface and stir those anaerobic areas, releasing the gas before it has a chance to build up.

They aren't necessary if you stir your substrate manually, but it's easier to just keep a family of MTS in the tank.
 

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Buy one MTS for your 5.5 gallon, because it will be pregnant anyways.

The reason MTS are good for a small grain sand is because small grain sand traps anaerobic pockets, where the bacteria in the sand will create a toxic gas as they consume nitrates. If these pockets aren't frequently disrupted by movement, they'll build up this gas and release it all at once, which basically gasses any inhabitants in the area. Most fish can survive this, but there are some which will die, and in a 5.5 gallon tank, the risk towards livestock will be greater.

The MTS scoot around under the surface and stir those anaerobic areas, releasing the gas before it has a chance to build up.

They aren't necessary if you stir your substrate manually, but it's easier to just keep a family of MTS in the tank.

Thanks for this info. I have MTS but really doesnt aware how this small critters works wonders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Buy one MTS for your 5.5 gallon, because it will be pregnant anyways.

The reason MTS are good for a small grain sand is because small grain sand traps anaerobic pockets, where the bacteria in the sand will create a toxic gas as they consume nitrates. If these pockets aren't frequently disrupted by movement, they'll build up this gas and release it all at once, which basically gasses any inhabitants in the area. Most fish can survive this, but there are some which will die, and in a 5.5 gallon tank, the risk towards livestock will be greater.

The MTS scoot around under the surface and stir those anaerobic areas, releasing the gas before it has a chance to build up.

They aren't necessary if you stir your substrate manually, but it's easier to just keep a family of MTS in the tank.
Thanks a lot for the info. How often should I stir up my sand until I get my MTS?

and ugh I found the ninja surviving pond snails.. anyone know if they bring any benefits like the MTS ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Pond snails mainly eat algae (and plants? not sure) and reproduce. That's....about it.
they are usually on my aquarium glass.. so would them cleaning the smudges on it as a good thing lol.. and man.. damn the pond snails.. damn them to hell... I just won't bother. I'll consider them as the back up clean up crew.
 

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Look at Nerites if you want awesome Algae eating snails that can't reproduce in FW. I also like my MTS. I do have a few Pond Snails, but I mostly weed those out. They don't hurt my plants, but I don't love their looks. And they compete with my Shrimp for biofilm.

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Mhmm pond snails.. I'm okay with their looks.. but them competing for biofilm and multiplying really easily is a concern.. but I guess I can weed them out if I see an excess.

and please note that I don't overfeed ._. I only feed every 3 days.. I'm thinking they get their food from the Java Moss forest I have and reproduce madly.

oh well. I'm just going to have pond snails and trumpet snails in my aquarium. I don't think I'd like Nerite snails because I'd have to replenish them if I run out of them, and do they do the same job the MTS does? Aerate sand substrate?
 

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You'll never rid of pond snails unless you get some assassins. Once you got them, they are there. In the filter, in the plants, eggs everywhere.
 

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Nerites are just really good algae eaters, they never go under the substrate

I have a question of my own. I've tried adding MTS to my tank twice, both in decent quantities and they all appear to be dead... Shells on the substrate surface and they're just gone....
What happened? Dosing EI and heavy CO2, Ph 5.5, GH 5, KH 0-1

Sorry to derail :tongue:
 

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Nerites are just really good algae eaters, they never go under the substrate

I have a question of my own. I've tried adding MTS to my tank twice, both in decent quantities and they all appear to be dead... Shells on the substrate surface and they're just gone....
What happened? Dosing EI and heavy CO2, Ph 5.5, GH 5, KH 0-1

Sorry to derail :tongue:

I am having the same issue and would like to know too. Sorry to be a little off topic. Any experts?
 

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Pond snails have one thing, infusoria seems to grow pretty well in their slime trails, so if you have baby fish, they might have more food in the tank than if not... haha, that's about it though
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Pond snails have one thing, infusoria seems to grow pretty well in their slime trails, so if you have baby fish, they might have more food in the tank than if not... haha, that's about it though
does this "infusoria" provide a source for baby shrimp? (I don't raise fish in my tank only red cherry shrimp XD)
 

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I'm sure it does, but pond snails are still nasty. You know what provides more food for baby shrimp than infusoria? A crushed pond snail :p
 

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+1 on what mor said, i know my ph is low but idk what exactly and ive almost wiped out a population of several hundreds, i used to be able to pull about 50 a week out with no decrease in population now i can see maybe one or two due the the acidity of the water eating holes in the shells
 

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Heavy co2 and a pH of 5.5 is probably the issue there. Those aren't conducive to growing snails

mordalphus,

ok, I have to admit that I actually did not know what my water params were, but my cardinal tetras lived. I have heard that MTS can survive harsh environments, and am curious why my cardinal tetras are surviving and not MTS?

keithy
 

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cardinal tetras thrive in a pH of 5.5 and lower, that's what their natural environment is. MTS hate acidic environment. CO2 dissolved in water is carbonic acid, which wears away snail shells. Snails cannot live with holes in their shells (they get infected/etc).

Also, if carbon dioxide dissolved in water is anything like carbon dioxide gas, it is heavier than air, and it may settle at the bottom of the tank? I don't know, just throwing out guesses here.
 

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Very educated guesses..... Haha
My tap comes out at 7.5.... And my tank ph is 5.5 so when I do y water changes on Sunday, it levels out at 6.5. Just guessing. Will take some measurements tomorrow. But in a weeks course it drops back to 5.5. Can heavy co2 be the cause? Since I don't think it can drop the ph THAT much.
 
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