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well, it isn't running rampant - but there is a alot and I have tried everything (it feels like). I have a 55 gallon tank. I have both black and green algae (see pics).
I run FluvalSmart Aquasky 1200 mm lights. Please see settings in photo as well. I fertilize with Thrive low tech (recently changed from their shrimp version), add stress coat, stress zyme with water changes. I change water every other week (1/3 of tank). I put in root tabs every couple months. As you can see from the photos, there aren't many plants left. Started out with triple of what you see. Please ask if I forgot some info. Also, plants do good for a while then just slowly start to die. I use my well water.

Recent readings:
Phosphate: 0
PH 8.0
ammonia 0
kh 6 (107.4)
gh 7 (125.3)
Nitrate 5
nitrite 0

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For starters, I want to make sure you are not using water that has been put through a water softener. If it is, stop and find a way to bypass the softener. Plants really dont like "softened" water. I may also suggest changing water once a week instead of every other week. I may try these first steps.

What plants are you using in your setup? Specific plants can require special care.
 

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Hi @marshmallow

You don't appear to be injecting CO2. So, your plants are lacking a source of carbon. That probably explains the lack of plant growth. I suggest that this is the first thing to consider.

Anon
 

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I feel like before we go down the route of CO2, I would consider keeping this tank lower light, as the plants shown here are not very demanding ones.

First off, your observation how new plants seem to do well, then die. It can be a lot of things, but IME, the plant has enough energy reserves initially to push out some growth, but then as it runs out, it needs to acclimate to its new environment, and this can be seen visibly as melting and plant die back. Happens to me as well, scary to see always, but if conditions are favorable, the plant should be able to bounce back in the new environment it is in.

@Anon is right when you need CO2 if you want faster growth. Faster growth means more light, more light causes more carbon and resource demand by the plants, and if they don't have what they need, they die.

Im curious what your question is OP? Are you asking for insight as to what to do or what is going on?
 

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@Anon is right when you need CO2 if you want faster growth.
Hi @puopg

I wasn't pushing for faster growth, simply providing a source of carbon for growth. Reducing light intensity will obviously help. But, the plants still need carbon, preferably in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2). So, I would favour a very low injection rate - perhaps a few bubbles per minute. I'd aim to keep a drop checker colour on the border between blue and green. Having said that, you're obviously familiar with the plants in the OP's tank - so, perhaps CO2 is simply not necessary.

Anon :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Im curious what your question is OP? Are you asking for insight as to what to do or what is going on?
I am wondering if someone can look at the specs and tell me the reason for plant die off and algae issues. Is it the nutrient levels, light levels (the light is already so limited), how I have the light set regarding red, green, blue, etc.
 

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Yes, CO2 is not necessary for these plants. And reducing light intensity is also probably not necessary as this Aquasky is not too powerful. In fact, it may be the reason all other plants died.

OP, can you please provide more information? What were the other plants that died? How did you measure your water parameters, e.g. KH and GH up to the fractions of ppm? Do you fertilize you water at all? Who lives in the tank and how much do you feed them? You mentioned root tabs but they will not do anything for anubias on a driftwood and 5 ppm of nitrate is very low, can cause the death of fast growing plants.
 

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I am wondering if someone can look at the specs and tell me the reason for plant die off and algae issues. Is it the nutrient levels, light levels (the light is already so limited), how I have the light set regarding red, green, blue, etc.
Haha i guess everyone has different opinions, but for anubias and what looks like bacopa, for me I put those in low light tolerant plants, so you can find success without CO2.

Given there are lots of variables and unknowns here, definitively, its tough to say what is the root cause. Likely its not insufficient light, and since ur dosing ferts, prolly not ferts.

I would say, its a combination of having more light than you think (remember ur eyes are really bad at gauging PAR), arguably infrequent water changes 30% ever 2 weeks is low for planted tanks. Usually people like to go 50% every week. I would increase ur water changes a bit to weekly if you can. U really can't overdo water changes. (within reason).



I would focus on the new growth the plants are putting out, mainly the stems as those grow faster so you can see. If the new growth looks good, thats great. If it looks deformed, or the roots are dying and stems are melting, thats not great.

And finally, you have very very very few plants. Having an adequate and healthy plant mass helps in keeping algae at bay. Floating plants are also really great at taking up nutrients, blocking some light as they don't need any CO2 as they have full access to the air.
 

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I see that you are testing zero phosphouus. I'm not familiar with 'Thrive low tech' (it's not listed on their web site), does it have another name? Low tech ferts often have no phosphorous or nitrate so they can be used in heavily stocked (fish) tanks. In those tanks, the phosphorous will come from the fishfood. I can't see any fish in your tank. Who's living in there?

Anyway, check your fertilizer.
 
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