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^Agreed with Hoppy, need more info.


If you are using a single 3-watt type LED and running it under 500mA, you can mount it to any piece of aluminum (or copper) that's around 1/8" thick or more and as wide as possible. I'd shoot for a 2X2" piece.

If you are running it more than 500mA I recommend you look around for something a bit beefier. You can get all sorts of small useful heatsinks from computer repair shops. Just take the LED to them and ask if they have any scrap heatsinks laying around that have a flat spot big enough to handle that LED. And again, the bigger, the better.


If you are approaching 1,000mA on your current, you definitely want something that's around 3/16ths or 1/4" thick with some fins.
 

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Interesting problem. Those heat sinks were originally for electronics and the holes were for attaching the heat sink to the chassis.
If you are handy with a drill, or have access to a drill press, drill a couple of holes in the other side for a hanger or to mount on a rail, such as an aluminum bar. Thermal epoxy would probably work too.

If you're patient, self drilling self tapping screws are what I've used to mount single LEDs to computer surplus heat sinks. That would save the cost of a tap.
 

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Yeah you could use basically any good brand 2-part epoxy since you're sticking the heatsink to something else. Thermal epoxy is costly but will work too.


The problem have with these is that huge hole in the middle. I would not run any LED over 300mA with this heatsink. The hole is in a fatally unfortunate spot, right where the heat is produced and where heatsinking is ESPECIALLY critical.

For the price, you could buy a 12" strip of their other heatsink ($10) and cut it into 1" long squares for individual LEDs. You'd have 11-12 of them for $10.

To cut them all you need is either a miter saw, a table saw (with sliding square), a reciprocating "sawzall", or jigsaw with a clamp to hold it.

You could sweat it with a handheld hacksaw too. De-burr it with sandpaper or a dremel with a sanding drum on it.


But I would not use this:
 
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