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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So you get your tank all set up, (hardscape) using sand for the substrate along with fluorite (never again) for the planted areas, its time to put water in the tank, how do you do it in a timely manner with out destroying all that you just did.
 

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Place a small plate in the bottom of the aquarium and direct the water flow on to it. This prevents erosion of your carefully planted tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Tried that, problem being the hose valve is out side so I had to attach a shut off on the other end, this leads to quite the spray when I turn it on. Wheres my grandkids when you need them.
 

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Tried that, problem being the hose valve is out side so I had to attach a shut off on the other end, this leads to quite the spray when I turn it on. Wheres my grandkids when you need them.
Same issue here. I turn the cold water down low, turn on the hot water until I hit my temp on a digital thermometer, turn on the water in the tank and aim against the glass. If you have to you can tie the hose to the center brace if you have one using fishing line. If you have no brace you will need some help lol.
 

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One of the most critical but hard things to learn is patience! Adding water is one of those.
I suggest that you will get better results when going slower and one way to go is to start the water flow slowly and then as you see what it is doing, you can gradually increase the flow. However, it will be important to fight the urge to speed it up to the point that it blows the sub around.
I find one of the best ways to get my major tank work done is to first perk a cup of coffee to have handy. When I get the urge to rush, I take a good drink of coffee instead.
One of the old posters at work had this to say:
If we don't have time to do the job right, how will we ever find time to do it over? Planted tank folks may need that printed on the back of their hand.
I find tying a rock to the hose is a good way to hold it down until I get back. I even keep one on my siphon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I like it, I see I wasn't the only one who's had trouble with this. I like the garden spray head idea.

The first time I filled it up I felt like I was geoscaping a planet.
 

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If we don't have time to do the job right, how will we ever find time to do it over?
:bounce:
I like it! Cousin to 'if you always do what you always did, you always get what you always got!
To the OP...Get a simple spring loaded clamp (tools section at Lowes or Home depot) to hold the hose in the tank AND start out with low water pressure/flow....it's not a race! :)
 

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I just kink the hose with my left hand, and slowly open. I like living dangerously running through the house with a kinked hose supplying tanks. It gives me the power to say or do anything....'give me that candybar, or I'll unkink on you...', 'give me 20 bucks...', etc.
 

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Tyvek dish cloth on top of everything, then just let your hose run through that. it absorbs the shock of the water coming in, and stops sand and plants flying everywhere.
I use it on my nano tank. You just need to look at that hard enough to disturb it.
 

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My present tanks are all pretty small, and I use an extra 5 gallon bucket with an old, worn (noisy) pond pump and short piece of garden hose with a plastic garden wand/sprayer with a shutoff. The bucket lets me warm, treat or fertilize the water before I transfer it in. I can also control the flow.

I used to have a Python water changer but the municipal water could be a long shot for bad chemicals.

Bump:
I just kink the hose with my left hand, and slowly open. I like living dangerously running through the house with a kinked hose supplying tanks. It gives me the power to say or do anything....'give me that candybar, or I'll unkink on you...', 'give me 20 bucks...', etc.
That so resonates with my subconscious. >:)
 

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I use a small plastic bucket with holes drilled in the bottom and sides of the bottom. I put the hose in it and let her rip, slowly.



It does a good job diffusing the blast. I had a couple of spots around the side holes that had been pushes around. But it was about the side of a common snail and my finger tips took care of that in all of a second afterwards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Like all these ideas, I went and bought a lawn sprinkler, I like the bucket idea though.

The old company I worked for, there's less time to it again then to do it right the first time, right before they ask you why it's taking so long to get the job done.
 

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I bet even putting a plastic bag on top of the water would do what my cloth does too. It looks like it is defying physics but it is easy and painless.
 

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Bubble wrap. Put enough of it down to cover a large area of your substrate/scape. Fill slowly and it will float as the water fills. As it floats higher, you can increase the water flow.
 

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You don't even need to cover everything. You just need something to slow down the water with sheering force.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Bubble wrap. Put enough of it down to cover a large area of your substrate/scape. Fill slowly and it will float as the water fills. As it floats higher, you can increase the water flow.
What a compelling idea
 

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The key to adding the water is to slow it down to trickle. I filled a 180 gallon and it took me about 6 hours with no cloudiness. The first two hours only got 3" of water but after that I was able to speed it up.
 
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