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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't seem to find an answer to this question and I thought maybe someone here would know. When you reseal a tank, why doesn't the seam between the panes need to be replaced also? If the outer silicone has aged too far, why hasn't the seam between aged the same and need replacing? I am resealing a 20 long to use for a sump and would like to know the answer, if there is one....lol
 

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Good question. If the tank is leaking there has to be a compromise in the silicone between the panes of glass.

My guess is that ideally all the silicone should be replaced, but to remove the silicone between the glass so it can be resealed, would probably require the tank to be dismantled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The tank has to be broken down and reassembled to replace the inner silicone and that is a job I haven't undertaken yet. I have resealed one other tank and it is doing fine. What I think is the inner seam is not subjected to constant exposure to water, algae, all the things inside a thriving tank so the silicone takes much longer to degrade to the point of needing replacement. I agree if it is leaking then there is a hole in the seam, but there are videos out there where the author says to just reseal if there is a leak. Is silicone so string that even if there is a hole in the inner seam it can still hold the glass together? I would really like to know how this works.
 

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I don't think it's as much of an issue with the silicone degrading as it is being physically damaged. The inner seal gets damaged and abused by cleaning and scraping. The stuff between the glass is pretty much protected.
 

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Some years ago, I bought a heavily used 80 gallon and "resealed" it. Not a true reseal because I didn't dismantle the tank and remove/reapply the silicone between the panels. You're supposed to dismantle and reseal if the tank is leaking because water is getting through the silicone that joins the panels. If you were to only remove the inner bead, then reapply the inner bead, you haven't fixed the leak in between the panels, you just patched over it. Sometimes this is ok, but there is always a risk of accidentally damaging the inner bead while cleaning the glass, and the leak can be exposed again. In my case, the tank wasn't leaking, and I was lazy, so I just cleaned the inner bead and reapplied it. It was perfectly fine for a few years, up until I sold it.
 
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