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Hi guys,

I'm on damage control today. The casualties (60+ RCS) occurred within 24 hours of adding 8lbs of Seiryu to my 10 gallon tank. The shrimp colony had been happy for the past 2 years until today.

I suspect the casualties have been caused by a big PH swing, but could the Sieryu have affected the water so quickly? My GH is 5 and KH 2. I've always remineralized my RO water to those parameters.

Thanks for the advice.
 

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That would be the right course of action.

The more acidic the pH is in the tank, the more that the seiryu stone will dissolve.

The more alkaline the pH is, the less the seiryu stone will dissolve.


pH could have been an issue but I would lean towards osmotic shock first if there was a rapid change in parameters, OR perhaps the stone wasn't clean and had something on it that wasn't shrimp safe.
 

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I am sorry to hear of your loss. Did you wash your stones before adding them to the tank? I have Seiryu stones in two of my tanks but they were added when the tanks with still cycling. That is a lot of Seiryu stones to add to a 10-gallon tank.

Post-Script: I was just looking at the web and FlipAquatics and other shrimp sites do not say that Seiryu Stone is harmful to shrimp and in fact sell Seiryu Stone. Whether that means you can add to an established tank is uncertain? What is the source of your stones, is it a reliable source?
 

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Wouldn't be the pH swing, @bataleon, but the osmotic shock, as suggested, with rapidly increasing water hardness as the stone dissolves. While the gH (and kH) is a bit low for Neocaridina, rapidly increasing it while simultaneously decreasing the volume of water (when you offset space by adding rock) could cause a massive die-off.

Where'd you obtain the stone, if you care to share? And how did you prepare it? Was it washed and soaked for a week or so prior to use? That's pretty much a necessity, as stone like that is frequently treated with herbicides and pesticides when not properly imported with good documentation. Most of the product in Australia comes directly from China, where there's not always proper documentation to know what's happened with products you're buying. So there's a relatively high probability of there being something on the stone you used - along with osmotic shock.

I wouldn't rely on that retailer for accurate information, @dornblaser, and would refer to forums like this where there are people with more than a couple years of shrimp experience. They're just a reseller of imports with a flashy YouTube channel - not a place you'll ever find experienced people recommending. Simple reality that they don't offer warnings about Seiryu or explain that there are multiple varieties should be a red flag for you.
 

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Wouldn't be the pH swing, @bataleon, but the osmotic shock, as suggested, with rapidly increasing water hardness as the stone dissolves. While the gH (and kH) is a bit low for Neocaridina, rapidly increasing it while simultaneously decreasing the volume of water (when you offset space by adding rock) could cause a massive die-off.

Where'd you obtain the stone, if you care to share? And how did you prepare it? Was it washed and soaked for a week or so prior to use? That's pretty much a necessity, as stone like that is frequently treated with herbicides and pesticides when not properly imported with good documentation. Most of the product in Australia comes directly from China, where there's not always proper documentation to know what's happened with products you're buying. So there's a relatively high probability of there being something on the stone you used - along with osmotic shock.

I wouldn't rely on that retailer for accurate information, @dornblaser, and would refer to forums like this where there are people with more than a couple years of shrimp experience. They're just a reseller of imports with a flashy YouTube channel - not a place you'll ever find experienced people recommending. Simple reality that they don't offer warnings about Seiryu or explain that there are multiple varieties should be a red flag for you.
Got it.
 
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