The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a short (5-10 in) grass- or reed-like plant that grows well partially emersed in a dry climate.

Some possible options I've found are Eleocharis acicularis and montevidensis. However, I find that a lot of tropical aquatic plants that can grow partially emersed don't do well in low humidity environments. I'm worried that the same will be true for the hairgrasses.

Does anyone have experience growing hairgrass partially emersed in a dry climate or does anyone know of a 5-10in grass-like plant that would grow well partially emersed in a dry climate?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,147 Posts
I'm looking for a short (5-10 in) grass- or reed-like plant that grows well partially emersed in a dry climate.

Some possible options I've found are Eleocharis acicularis and montevidensis. However, I find that a lot of tropical aquatic plants that can grow partially emersed don't do well in low humidity environments. I'm worried that the same will be true for the hairgrasses.

Does anyone have experience growing hairgrass partially emersed in a dry climate or does anyone know of a 5-10in grass-like plant that would grow well partially emersed in a dry climate?
Maybe check on "natives"
Bit tall and basal roundish leaves.

Point is you might want to check outside the box..

Not sure how dry the microclimate is above water especially w/ limited air movemment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Maybe check on "natives"
Bit tall and basal roundish leaves.

Point is you might want to check outside the box..

Not sure how dry the microclimate is above water especially w/ limited air movemment.
I'm a little leery of native's because they have season quirks that can't easily be replicated in the aquarium. At least that's what I've heard. I've never actually tried native plants in an aquarium.

I've grown it hairgrass by seed outdoors. You can find it sold sometimes in nurseries as a pond plant under the name 'spikerush'. Any other pond plant that takes your fancy will also grow emersed just fine.
Good to know. Spikerush is a different species, but perhaps it's a sign that other hairgrass species will be OK partially emersed. In the past, the problems I've had with partially emersed plants is their emersed leaves desiccating. I could see hairgrass being more resilient to desiccation because they aren't broad-leaved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
Disclaimer- I have never done this but I did loan my ponds to people that needed to "winterize" their native aquarium plants and they told me this is how they did it before I made my ponds.

If you use containers you can use a tupperware bins left outside. If you live in a warmer climate ignore me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
I'm looking for a short (5-10 in) grass- or reed-like plant that grows well partially emersed in a dry climate.

Some possible options I've found are Eleocharis acicularis and montevidensis. However, I find that a lot of tropical aquatic plants that can grow partially emersed don't do well in low humidity environments. I'm worried that the same will be true for the hairgrasses.

Does anyone have experience growing hairgrass partially emersed in a dry climate or does anyone know of a 5-10in grass-like plant that would grow well partially emersed in a dry climate?
Prince Tut Dwarf Egyptian Papyrus (Cyperus) is a cultivar which stays short and is content in a wide range of humidity conditions as long as it is in wet or bog conditions at the roots. Brighter conditions produce a more compact plant (under 18" tall). It's often available in garden centers.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top