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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I currently have two tanks:
A 45 gallon with
1 Red Tail Shark
1 Silver-Finned Shark
3 Australian Rainbowfish
1 Common Plecostomus
1 Blue Ram

A 10 gallon with
1 Julii Cory
1 Blue Ram

I had both blue rams in the 45 gallon, but then moved one to the 10 gallon because I saw them picking on each other.

My question: What fish would work with my 45 gallon tank? Fish that you would recommend... Thanks in advance for your recommendations. :smile:
 

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A 45 gallon is going to be too small for 1 shark in about a year, the pleco will outgrow it even quicker

sent from an undisclosed location using morse code
 

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common plecos can reach 18". the red tails can get to 5" but they need a 50g tank, to be happy.

that silver fin will reach 10-14" and needs a 70g tank.

if i were you i would get rid of both sharks, rescape the tank, and re-introduce the other blue ram. i think the aggression you saw was related to the more aggressive shark in the tank. also a 10g is far to small for a ram, they need at bare minimum a 20g tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Both of the sharks are not aggressive, I haven't seen them attack any fish... I read that male blue rams don't get along with each other... I thought that may be the case. Thanks for the input though.
 

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Wow.... First julii cory's need at least a group of 3, 5 being better. Silver-finned sharks are a type of catfish and they require brackish-water, eventually they will even need full marine. They get over a foot long and can become agressive. Common pleco can get even bigger than 18", I've seen 2 foot. They are horrible algae eater, and are actually omnivores, consuming more meat than veggie. Red tail sharks can get very agressive as they get older and are not very good community fish. Australian rainbowfish get huge, although it takes them many many years. They will eventually get at least 5", some very old fish can get bigger.
 

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From AqAdviosr
*DOES NOT INCLUDE SLIVER TIP SHARK*
Note: Red Tailed Black Shark may jump - lids are recommended.
Note: Common Pleco needs driftwood.
Warning: Common Pleco is not recommended for your tank - it may eventually outgrow your tank space, potentially reaching up to 18 inches.
Warning: At least 5 x Eastern Rainbowfish are recommended in a group.
Warning: Your selected species may eventually require 313% of your aquarium space. You may need to deal with territorial aggressions later on. Try removing some of (Pterygoplichthys pardalis, Mikrogeophagus ramirezi) or get a larger tank.


Recommended temperature range: 26 - 26 C. [Display in Farenheit]
Recommended pH range: 6.4 - 7.
Recommended hardness range: 5 - 12 dH.





Recommended water change schedule: 74% per week. (You might want to split this water change schedule to two separate 49% per week)
Your aquarium stocking level is 157%.
Your tank is overstocked. Unless you are an experienced aquarist who can meet the maintenance/biological needs of this aquarium, lower stocking levels are recommended. [Generate Image]



From liveaquaria on the sliver tips
Minimum Tank Size: 70 gallons
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Water Conditions: 74-79° F, KH 10-12, pH 7.0-7.5
Max. Size: 10"
Color Form: White, Yellow
Diet: Omnivore
Origin: Central America, North America, South America
Family: Ariidae
Also known as the Black Fin Shark, the Columbian Shark is a catfish which will grow quite large in an aquarium. It may also be referred to as Jordan's Catfish or the West American Cat Shark. The Columbian Shark has a high fin and long "whiskers" that gives it a classic catfish appearance.

Setting up a tank to match its natural environment will require plenty of plants and rocks. Since it grows quite large, starting with a minimum tank size of 70 gallons is recommended. As the Columbian Shark grows larger, there is a chance that the shark will eat smaller tank mates. This species prefers some aquarium salt in the water, and may also be acclimated slowly into a saltwater aquarium, as they live in both freshwater and saltwater during different times of their life.
 
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