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Discussion Starter #1
I built a stand but ut turned out to have a slight wobble... I guess either the wood was warped or my cuts were slightly off...its not too terrible i was thinking maybe some wood shims under the two corners that are a little off to make it level or should i put my tank on it and allow the weight to level it out amd adjust the screws accordingly? Just fishing(haha) for some ideas

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If the stand itself is solid and square and the floor is a bit unlevel, then a shim in one corner wiould be helpful.
If the stand itself is a little wobbly, then a shim will not help much.

Post a picture of what you have done, not how the corners are assembled, and I am sure one of use can further advise.
 

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There can always be a problem with any stand, or the floor, for that matter, and any slight imperfection puts stress on the glass and seams, which can cause a panel to break or a seam to let go. I always use a thin piece of Styrofoam between all my tanks and stands, no matter if it's wood, metal, store-bought or homemade, and I have never, ever had a tank start leaking, not even homemade tanks. The foam distributes the weight of any slight or medium uneven spots across a broad area to reduce excessive pressure in any one point of the aquarium's base. I usually use the sheets (usually about 1/2" thick) used as protective packaging in to-be-assembled furniture like you buy at WallyWorld or Targé', but if you have to buy a Styrofoam sheet at your local building supply, it's not expensive; just cut it to fit the base/frame of your tank. You can hide it with a single length of black electrical tape wrapped all the way around it. (Incidentally, the one time I got in a hurry and didn't use it - on a 55 I just set up a few weeks ago - after filling the aquarium and putting the light on it, and before adding gravel, I noticed a thin crack of light between the corners of the bottom tank frame and the store bought wood stand. I didn't take it down, but I'll be worried about it until I move the tank in the very near future.)

Olskule
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So an update its probably about a half inch off in total and the bottom frame is not prefectly square with the top frame so idk if im comfortable with using it kinda sucks because i put alot of time and tried to get it perfect :/ but its all trial and error right

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Discussion Starter #11
I may have come across a good solid oak cabinet for free so of all else fails.... Bazinga lol

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I still recommend using a sheet of Styrofoam under every tank. Even if the stand is absolutely perfect, all foundations, no matter the type, have a chance of settling and causing a stress leak. Unless, of course, your house is built directly on bedrock. Why take a chance when it costs less than a onetime cost of $10 at most to have a little "insurance"?

Olskule
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I still recommend using a sheet of Styrofoam under every tank. Even if the stand is absolutely perfect, all foundations, no matter the type, have a chance of settling and causing a stress leak. Unless, of course, your house is built directly on bedrock. Why take a chance when it costs less than a onetime cost of $10 at most to have a little "insurance"?

Olskule
I completely agree styrofoam is the best plus a little added insulation never hurt xD

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Is it glued? Or just screwed? I would take it apart, now you know where you went wrong, easy fix. Nothing beats a well built stand you make yourself. For me it's an addiction to try to build bigger and better with each stand I build.

This is my last build.



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Is it glued? Or just screwed? I would take it apart, now you know where you went wrong, easy fix. Nothing beats a well built stand you make yourself. For me it's an addiction to try to build bigger and better with each stand I build.

This is my last build.



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Nice stand, Buddha. I have a homemade stand coming with the 125 I'm picking up next week. I've seen pictures of it and it looks a little plain, so I plan to spruce it up with some molding and trim, and maybe paint it, too. I was originally thinking a black lacquer look, but I saw one on here that the poster had painted white, and it looked good. Since my "space" is smallish and it's such a large aquarium, I'm thinking the lighter color might be preferable to black.

Olskule
 

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I still recommend using a sheet of Styrofoam under every tank. Even if the stand is absolutely perfect, all foundations, no matter the type, have a chance of settling and causing a stress leak. Unless, of course, your house is built directly on bedrock. Why take a chance when it costs less than a onetime cost of $10 at most to have a little "insurance"?

Olskule
You'd be surprised at how little support a tank truly needs. The farm I got my 22 gallon breeders from had them on 2 galvanized pipes running the length of his aisles. And he had hundreds of tanks that way for decades.

I've got mine on a variety of stands some metal some wood. The wood stands are for the most part supporting the entire perimeter. My metal stands are a different story. In many spots I can see large gaps. And don't tell me they will eventually fail most of them are decades old. And I still have a couple of tanks from 1980 that are still on the metal stand I bought with them. Heck I've even had them on flimsy plastic stands that were sold back then and while the plastic deteriorated the tanks are still around. While acrylic tanks need full support glass tanks can get by without it. I would never recommend styrofoam under any glass tank. I never recommend anything between the tank and the stand. And there are members here who have tanks on nothing but four concrete blocks that are going for years.
 
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...I would never recommend styrofoam under any glass tank. I never recommend anything between the tank and the stand. And there are members here who have tanks on nothing but four concrete blocks that are going for years.
Yes, I know that, in principle, silicon sealed glass aquariums are extremely strong, and perhaps 99 out of 100 or more will never develop a stress-related leak, but there is that small percentage of tanks that may not have been manufactured perfectly (with maybe just a fingerprint on the glass where a seam is) and are susceptible to failure, or that one stand, that one point of a house's foundation that gives just enough to cause a problem. Also, the pressures involved increase exponentially the higher the volume of the aquarium, especially the taller you go. 10 gallon tanks are incredibly strong for their volume, but 100+ gallon tanks hold a lot of pressure. How else do you explain the horror stories of coming home to find a living room full of water and dead fish in a dry tank? They are true and I have seen it happen firsthand; everything is fine, then you hear a ripping sound and then the sound of a waterfall coming from the room the 120 gallon aquarium is in, then you're scampering for damage control. It happens. Maybe not often, but it happens. That's why I referred to it as "insurance". It is well worth the tiny bit of extra effort to avoid the potential hundreds or thousands of dollars in damage, not to mention the potential hassle of cleaning up and the loss of the setup and the fish. It's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. But take your chances as you want; as for myself, I'll err on the side of caution.

Olskule
 

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@The Big Buddha
Thats nice. What wood working tools do you have?
Thanks... Not too many. Handheld router, table saw, miter saw, drill and a bunch of clamps. Would like a wood working shop one day, no room though right now. I built the doors from scratch. Probably the most time consuming of the whole build.

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...Would like a wood working shop one day, no room though right now.

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Me and you, both, Buddha. I picked up that aquarium and stand the other day, and you wouldn't believe this homemade stand! There were finishing nails every 2" and EIGHT 4" X 4" treated posts built into it! I decided to tear it down and rebuild it, so I took 36 4" drywall screws out of just ONE 6' long front frame 2" X 4". This thing was heavier than the 125 gallon tank that goes on it. Most of the framing is quality lumber, so I'll just have to spring for some furniture-quality plywood and molding to skin it with. It should turn out well. I know I won't have to buy any screws, that's for sure!

Olskule
 
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