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Hey All,

I recently setup a tank with Seiryu stone and I have read that it affects PH, KH and GH when your PH is below 7.
Is this true?

It kinda makes sense to me because PH below 7 is acid which dissolves the calcium carbonate.
Vice versa for PH above 7, its alkaline water, so shouldnt dissolve the CACO3.

My water parameters are 8.1 before CO2 and 7.1 after CO2. So I shouldnt expect fluctuations in PH, KH or GH right?

Thanks

1031019
 

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75g, 33L, 2g and play tanks
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I don't know anything about this for sure. But I have heard of properties like this for rocks in aquariums. Found this on here:


and reading through this next one it seems that you're just going to want to do your own tests and such.


good luck.
 

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Calcium carbonate isn't insoluble in >7 pH water, it's just less soluble than in more acidic conditions, so I assume that seiryu stone is the same. I would absolutely expect your perimeters to drift between water changes, but I'm not sure by how much.
 

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Calcium carbonate isn't insoluble in >7 pH water, it's just less soluble than in more acidic conditions, so I assume that seiryu stone is the same. I would absolutely expect your perimeters to drift between water changes, but I'm not sure by how much.
Ocean conditions for reefs are 8.1 to 8.4 pH with an alkalinity of 7-8 kH and calcium of 400-500 ppm cas CaCo3, so Seiryu stone acting like limestone to raise kH and gH between water changes is definately happening.

As a rough estimate, a tds of 120 (3 gH) might rise to 160-180 over a week enforcing weekly water changes for success. They are needed anyway but now 50% water changes with some gH to 100 ppm is required. Adding a kH buffer is likely not at all needed. You can see how your tank behaives with a cheap Hanna TDS meter and adjust as needed.

There is a lot of determination in planted tankis not to test water. After some experience and adjustments I agree this is not needed much but should not be an emphasis until basics are tracked and understood. Without testing you are guessing even if using EI method promoting success. Test kits from LaMotte, Salifert are pretty much all that are needed.
 

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Think of stones, such as yours, as being a big chunk of CaCO3. There is a limit (solubility) to how much CaCO3 that water can hold. This limit is affected by pH, temperature and pressure. For our purposes, pH is the most variable, so let’s focus upon that.

The lower the pH, the more CaCO3 that will continue to dissolve, up to it’s limit. As it dissolves, it separates into a carbonate form (which is measured by KH) and calcium (which is measured by GH). So, as pH changes, so will the other readings. However, the pH only rises because the carbonate is now pushing the alkalinity (KH) up which, in turn, raises the pH. It’s a constant battle: if pH is forced down by either an acid or CO2, the CaCO3 keeps dissolving to reach it’s solubility limit and this pushes pH up ( the reason it’s called buffering). As pH rises, and solubility decreases, you can get precipitation, which is the white dust/crust that you can see around your tank.

This battle will be constant until the CaCO3 (your stone) has vanished, which may take a long time. If you don’t mind the result of this buffering activity, then leave the stone in. If you want to control these parameters (KH, GH and pH), particularly at lower levels, then you will have to remove the stone.
 
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No you can manage a hardscaped tank as it has been done for decades.

Seiryu will leach a predictable amount for life time of aquarium set up, usually a few years or more. Simply measure gH and kH monthly until you know pattern of rise. 50% water changes with no kH and some gH is all that is needed for Seiryu stone in the replacement water.. Once you are familiar with gH and kH levels you can switch to tds checker and know when it is time for a water change to remove detritus with it. I would say you do need rodi to be more successful. I use 30 gallon container in basement to 100 tds with green leaf gH. Lava stone or Pai ha stone are more inert and kH can be used in make up water.

I might estimate 30-40 tds rise a week until tested. Easy and once comfortable with pattern you will be fine. Plants are extremely forgiving compared to other setups. Bending over backyards to avoid running the most basic of water tests can work but not worthwhile to me.
 
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