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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(I posted in Low-tech but I think this is more appropriate, oops)

Hi All,

I can't seem to find enough information on this topic, but it's similar to the talk about using the screw-in CFL for a planted tank.

With the increasing price drop of LED screw-in bulbs and ease of purchase from your local stores, I want to know what experience people have had, and what's an effective solution?

I'm growing mainly moss, java ferns, and anubis. I'm thinking to changing my existing light to something stronger, my tank is a 13"x13" tall 15G aquarium.

What bulb do you guys recommend? I'm thinking 5000K PAR 20, in a clip on lamp slightly above the tank, or should I got with something else?

Thanks!

Tank - Aqueon » 15 Column Deluxe Aquarium Kit | Products

A19 Example - TCP 60W Equivalent Daylight (5000K) A19 Non-Dimmable LED Light Bulb (6-Pack)-LA1050KND6 - The Home Depot

PAR20 Example - EcoSmart 50W Equivalent Day Light (5000K) PAR20 LED Flood Light Bulb-ECS 20 50WE CW FL 120 FS1 BL - The Home Depot

PAR38 Example - EcoSmart 90W Equivalent Day Light (5000K) PAR38 LED Flood Light Bulb-ECS 38 90WE CW FL 120 FS1 BL - The Home Depot
 

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**** Posted in your other thread with same title****

Bump:
I saw this lightbulbs at Lowes and wondered if they would work for a Planted tank.
That would be a definite yes for the A19 TCP's, but you'll need a reflector shoplight 'hood'. The 6 pack of those lamps are possibly the deal of the decade for DIY low tech LED.
 

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Im using 4x the 120W equivilant ones PAR38s. They seem to do well. This is still a test phase for me. I have them 26 inches from the bottom of bulb to the substrate.

The PAR means how much of an angle the light is reflected or focused is a better term. So the lower the PAR #, the more narrow the beam is.

BTW, stay away from the BR ones... they are garbage. I have 20 of them sitting here doing nothing.
 

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Im using 4x the 120W equivilant ones PAR38s. They seem to do well. This is still a test phase for me. I have them 26 inches from the bottom of bulb to the substrate.

The PAR means how much of an angle the light is reflected or focused is a better term. So the lower the PAR #, the more narrow the beam is.

BTW, stay away from the BR ones... they are garbage. I have 20 of them sitting here doing nothing.
Sounds like the PAR20's would be good for spotlighting brighter areas in low light tanks.
 

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Sounds like the PAR20's would be good for spotlighting brighter areas in low light tanks.
Yeah I would assume that you will run into issues getting everything lighted the wider your tank is. Of course you can raise up the light to be higher and then get more of a beam spread, but then you lose the intensity of the light anyways so its a lose lose.
 

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I used led par 38 hydroponic bulbs I got off of dhgate for dirt cheap that definitely work. Way cheaper than any bulb at lowes or Home Depot. Have a narrow beam, but would get any plant I had under them to pearl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Do you have a link for these bulbs?

I just bought a PAR38 from Home Depot with a basic clip on hood, I'm wondering if the beam is too wide. There is a PAR30 option also...
 

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I'm interested in this too. I have a 630L (166 gallon) aquarium that I need to light on a severe budget. I've been looking at the floodlights on eBay. (Dimmable PAR20 PAR30 PAR38 LED Par Lights Bulbs Flood Lamps 18W 24W 30W 36W)

I was thinking 5 PAR38 36W (aquarium is 170cm/67" long by 61cm/24" high and wide) with three 6500K and two 3300K so that I can just run the warmer lights at night and not mess with human sleep cycles (from being exposed to too much blue light before sleep).

My concern however being such a big tank is that the PAR38 still isn't going to be enough to get it to a medium strength lighting.

The PAR means how much of an angle the light is reflected or focused is a better term. So the lower the PAR #, the more narrow the beam is.
I think you are confusing PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) with beam angle? PAR is the plant equivalent of LUX

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/10-lighting/184368-lighting-aquarium-par-instead-watts.html
 
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