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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've ended up with 3 unexpectedly large cories in a relatively small tank. The tank is a 12" cube. The largest cory is ~3" long. I already feel bad, but the reason I ended up with them to begin with is because coworker is moving and couldn't take them, and also was considering having to put them down if I didn't take them.

I already know the tank is too small. Unfortunately it's the largest I can provide them at the moment. Knowing their love of exploring the footprint of a tank and chilling on generally flat surfaces, I was curious if a hollow shelf system of some sort might be nice for them. Something that would give them a top area with plants and whatnot, and a cave below so that they'd get a little more room to play in.

Or. I noticed they seem rather attracted to my anubias in the tank. Maybe using larger/ broader leaf anubias or other plants to give them "shelves" but that wouldn't take up a ton of space? What other stuff could I put under those? I prefer plants thick enough that I can't see gravel, but I can compromise for the refugees.
 

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The Corys may explore the top shelf, but wouldn't like to rest on it really unless there was cover/shade above the top shelf as well. I have made a similar platform out of slate (made a sand box using slate to create another tier of "footprint". It works, but Corys prefer to rest under shade. Then again in a tank that small they may see no other choice and rest there just to find more room to lay out.

Though large corys don't typically rest on leaves. Some of mine will, but it's not a preferred choice, but yes broadleaf plants would work best, especially if the leaves/stem is durable (won't flop due to the weight of the Cory). A hollow cave decor with a flat top might work.

If you have any containers/tubs, you could use those as a tank with more room, but yes you would want to use a seeded filter on it.

Any plans on getting a larger tank to keep them long term? If not, it's better to rehome the Corys.
 

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If it's within your budget you might be able to pick up a 20 gallon long tank for them. I found one at a garage sale. Paid $10 for it. I inherited four albino cories (most likely the albino version of your bronze cories) and laziness kept me from getting them a better home than the 5 gallon quarantine tank I put them in. It's been about ten days since I set them up with their own 20 gallon and they certainly behave better. Now they have a large enough foot print to actually shoal together. They chase around for extended periods and then rest in a little group. I may put a male Betta in with them, eventually. But for now they are certainly happy little creatures.

Good luck with your new charges. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I actually do have a 20 high (which admittedly isn't as good as a 20L), it's that I have neither the space nor permission to set it up. My cube is as large as I can go.

When coworker said she had cories I was thinking little bronzes or pandas or another smaller species. These are much larger than those, I believe they're corydoras plateaus, although the one seems to be exceptionally large, just under 3". Behavior wise they seem fine, active, but not stressed, and very social in their little triad. They actually get along fine with the Emerald Dwarf Raspboras that hide from everything. I did notice that they're probably malnourished- the person I got them from was only feeding them algae wafers.

I'll probably keep them for a couple weeks- I'm worried about the whole malnourished thing, and I really don't have another place to rehome them too. I'll try my LFS, but they don't always accept fish.
 

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Oh I've seen both healthy old Corydoras paleatus (peppered, camouflage-looking) and Corydoras aeneus (bronze) reach an actual length of 4 inches (and some of those were males!) with my own eyes!
My 2 year old pepper and bronze Corys are at 3+ inches now. C. paleatus and C. aeneus do grow much faster and larger than most Corydora species.

Hope they are just underfed and don't have internal worms. Get em plump before you rehome them. Note that females have much fatter/rounder bellies (and get larger overall) than males.

Sierra Fish and Pet down in Renton or Midway Tropical Fish and Pets in Kent (practically Des Moines) should be able to take them in (Sierra more likely). Offer them on Craigslist if you need to, that way you can be the one deciding who the fish go to (hopefully a good size home with experienced fish keeper).
 

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Put down a nice soft sand patch for the corries, they will love you, and you will get to see some of their natural behaviour.
I stick to salt and pepper corries, they seem to stay nice and small. I have one with super long fins, think it is a girl, but still on the young side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Oh I've seen both healthy old Corydoras paleatus (peppered, camouflage-looking) and Corydoras aeneus (bronze) reach an actual length of 4 inches (and some of those were males!) with my own eyes!
My 2 year old pepper and bronze Corys are at 3+ inches now. C. paleatus and C. aeneus do grow much faster and larger than most Corydora species.

Hope they are just underfed and don't have internal worms. Get em plump before you rehome them. Note that females have much fatter/rounder bellies (and get larger overall) than males.

Sierra Fish and Pet down in Renton or Midway Tropical Fish and Pets in Kent (practically Des Moines) should be able to take them in (Sierra more likely). Offer them on Craigslist if you need to, that way you can be the one deciding who the fish go to (hopefully a good size home with experienced fish keeper).
I'll admit, as terrible as it makes me feel, there's something remarkable about seeing 4 different species getting along so well, despite huge size differences. I have Heterandria Formosa (unfortunately haven't been able to get them all out), Emerald Dwarf Raspboras, a dwarf gourami, and the cories that dwarf everything... and everyone seems entirely chill and relaxed. I've seen the EDRs out more than usual, and they simply do not care that they have new tankmates.

The cories are even getting a nice sheen to them, a blue-green all over their bodies. Once I get them fattened up a bit on some proper food, I hope they'll find a new home quickly. I wouldn't say any are skinny, just... not as fat as a cory should be.

I'll try Tropical Fish World in Sumner since I'm only about 2 miles away from it. The rest are pretty far out of my way, but if need be, I'll do it.
 

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Haha peaceful community tanks with tons of peacefully coexisiting fish of vastly different sizes are what I have done. Should get into community tank if that's what you enjoy as well seeing different fish species all getting along. Though small tanks do limit choices a whole lot.

I would have offered to take them off your hands, but I already have a ton (they keep spawning, I don't even collect eggs anymore), and I'm also downsizing a whole lot. About to get rid of 95% of all my fish. Want to do some different stocking (angels and/or semi-aggressive monster fish) while I'm still in the hobby.
 
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