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From Seriously Fish:
Separating the species found on sale as ‘C. siamensis’ is tricky but differences do exist if combinations of characters are considered. C. atrilimes can be diagnosed by the following combination of characters: midlateral stripe extending to posterior extremity of median caudal-fin rays; 1 or 2 rows of faint dark spots along scale rows below lateral line; 1-1½ scale rows between anus and anal-fin origin; body depth 23.8-26.4 % SL; a single pair of rostral barbels.
The black lateral stripe runs from the snout to the tip of the caudal fin; the eye is pale brown above the pupil and white below; maxillary barbels are not visible; the lateral line is curved; the fins are a pale dusky yellow colour. Depending on mood this species has the ability to change the appearance of the dark body stripe, most obviously during bouts of sparring when it becomes much broader and paler in colour.
C. langei sensu amplo seems to be another commonly-traded, laterally-striped Crossocheilus and can be told apart from C. atrilimes by the following characters: the eye is reddish-golden above the pupil and white below; it has two pairs of barbels; the lateral line is essentially straight and passes through the centre of the dark body stripe; the fins are brownish.
Although the body stripe becomes paler when the fish are sparring it doesn’t change in width, and a further simple distinguishing trait is the presence of a dark blotch immediately in front of the anal fin on the underside of the fish. This fish is the one most often referred to as ‘Siamese algae eater/SAE’ in aquarium literature, but because it varies slightly from C. langei sensu stricto the possibility that it is not that species cannot be discounted.
The third most common fish in the aquarium hobby is an undescribed species sometimes referred to as C. sp. ‘citripinnis’. It’s a larger fish growing to 150 mm SL and possessing a clearly visible pair of maxillary barbels. The fins are lemon yellow in colour, this becoming more intense as the fish mature; the dark body stripe doesn’t alter in width or colour when the fish are sparring; the lateral line is curved and the overall body shape is similar to C. atrilmes meaning they’re easily confused as juveniles. There may also be other, potentially undescribed, species from Thailand being traded as ‘C. siamensis’ but as yet no detailed study has been conducted.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
From Seriously Fish:
Separating the species found on sale as ‘C. siamensis’ is tricky but differences do exist if combinations of characters are considered. C. atrilimes can be diagnosed by the following combination of characters: midlateral stripe extending to posterior extremity of median caudal-fin rays; 1 or 2 rows of faint dark spots along scale rows below lateral line; 1-1½ scale rows between anus and anal-fin origin; body depth 23.8-26.4 % SL; a single pair of rostral barbels.
The black lateral stripe runs from the snout to the tip of the caudal fin; the eye is pale brown above the pupil and white below; maxillary barbels are not visible; the lateral line is curved; the fins are a pale dusky yellow colour. Depending on mood this species has the ability to change the appearance of the dark body stripe, most obviously during bouts of sparring when it becomes much broader and paler in colour.
C. langei sensu amplo seems to be another commonly-traded, laterally-striped Crossocheilus and can be told apart from C. atrilimes by the following characters: the eye is reddish-golden above the pupil and white below; it has two pairs of barbels; the lateral line is essentially straight and passes through the centre of the dark body stripe; the fins are brownish.
Although the body stripe becomes paler when the fish are sparring it doesn’t change in width, and a further simple distinguishing trait is the presence of a dark blotch immediately in front of the anal fin on the underside of the fish. This fish is the one most often referred to as ‘Siamese algae eater/SAE’ in aquarium literature, but because it varies slightly from C. langei sensu stricto the possibility that it is not that species cannot be discounted.
The third most common fish in the aquarium hobby is an undescribed species sometimes referred to as C. sp. ‘citripinnis’. It’s a larger fish growing to 150 mm SL and possessing a clearly visible pair of maxillary barbels. The fins are lemon yellow in colour, this becoming more intense as the fish mature; the dark body stripe doesn’t alter in width or colour when the fish are sparring; the lateral line is curved and the overall body shape is similar to C. atrilmes meaning they’re easily confused as juveniles. There may also be other, potentially undescribed, species from Thailand being traded as ‘C. siamensis’ but as yet no detailed study has been conducted.

SAE's
That’s what makes me think Artimilis except the mention of the barbs not being visible. Crossocheilus obscurus also mentioned seems to say the same. Maybe I can tell the difference in the barbs but from everything I’ve read it’s one of the two.
 

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The easiest way to tell if it is a langei is if it has the black line on its underside. If it doesn’t have that, but it has visible barbels, then it is either a citripinnis or oblongus. From what I know, only the langei is actually good at eating BBA fwiw.
 
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