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Here's some pics of my S. repens, dhg and another mystery grass. Im wondering if they should be cut back to encourage spreading. And if so, exactly how should I do that?

The S. repens here is about 6 weeks planted, originally Top-Fin cultures from PetSmart. It's doing really well. Im just wondering if cutting the main stalk off at this point in time will encourage spreading, or otherwise benefit somehow. Or if it's best to just let it go for a while. Both the original stalks and new lower growth are growing pretty well.

Pics arent that great but it's the best I can do atm...Thanks for having a look :)






Here is the DHG. Same question, should I trim it down or something, to encourage spreading, or just let it go for a while?





Could somebody ID this for me? LFS had it labeled as DHG, but obviously it's not, or at least is some derivative.





Both grasses are growing pretty good. But some are putting off runners above the substrate level. Does that mean they are not planted deep enough?

TIA for any advice. :)

 

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S. repens can be cut at anytime, at your desired height, just cut it at the stem. If its healthy even leaving a couple of nodes are enough for it to regenerate. Cutting encourages side buds at lower areas, so if you want it to spread, that can help. It can be trimmed frequently without stunting

DHG - people say that cutting it may help it spread. I seem to have it spreading just fine without doing this, and have never found it necessary to trim just to get it to spread. And I've got it spreading at good speed in low tech tanks so.... I find that in DHG's case its quite correlated to light levels and density. If lighting is low, it grows longer, spreads slower. Higher lighting gives shorter growth and faster spreading. The time to trim is when the density of old growth is preventing new growth from turning up. Also some people plant in large bunches which isn't optimal to begin with; in such cases, trimming emersed growth away to make space for new growth makes sense. Thus I find that its the availability of light and space that affects spreading, not the act of trimming itself.

The unknown plant is probably microsword Lilaeopsis brasiliensis; if you can see parallel leaves on a horizontal rhizome. Its normal in this case.
 
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