The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi friends,

I have a 7 Gallon UNS 30C high tech. Twinstar 300SA light, full sized CO2, good bubbles per second. Good light green drop checker color. Not dosing any ferts yet. ADA ferts are at the ready, on hand. Filled and planted on April 18th, 2021. I'm 2 weeks in.

I planted Rotundifolia Red as stems on April 18th, performed four 30% water changes since then.

My question(s) are, obviously when you plant a stem plant it has to produce roots. When the plant is focusing on roots it can sacrifice leaves. Is it possible to plant this plant too close and therefore cause it to not receieve proper light and therefore melt? It is possible that the existing leaves grew out of water so theyre melting to acclimate to under water. Is it a good idea to let these plants decay instead of scrapping them and trying a different plant? Is this normal behavior of a newly planted stem plant or is this abnormal. Is it the correct choice to let a plant in this state possibly recover or should the decaying plant be removed for the sake of the entire tank? Not sure.

Couldn't I get new Rotundifolia Red stems and replant and possibly get a different result? (or no?) Maybe plant the stems less densely, more space between plants? (is that not even a factor for this plant?) Also not sure.

Photos below of Rotundifolia Red condition, pulled out. Good new root growth on them, planted as stems, but the rest of the old plant structure has significant decaying. Some new branch off leaf growth stemming out from a coupe of the plants.

(Worst offenders removed and tossed already. not pictured)
https://puu.sh/HCHqo/624e1b3ae0.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
What you are referring to is a melt: the redirection of resources from currently unsuitable tissues for the current situation to increase chance of survival. Yes.

You can let them melt and redirect resources, or you can trim away melting leaves as they pollute your water.

Make sure there is a method for the plants to get food. If you water change more often to counteract massive melt, then ensure you have your fertilizer and readded and make sure that your CO2 and distribution of that CO2 is correct.

Each water change resets your water back to an estimable, constant reference; it removes organics (and inorganics) that cause an un balance in your system -- BUT replace the necessary minerals and nutrients.


One thing: Ammonia passes through plant tissue freely and is not regulated, so a massive ammonia spike can melt a plant and this is not a re-direction of resources. A method to counteract ammonia accumulation is to change water (see above) -- of course, get to the root issue which may be a leeching substrate if it is brand new.

Josh
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
I start adding ferts as soon as I have a 0 nitrate reading and monitor for ammonia spikes from decaying plant matter. I dose lean at first and check keep an eye on parameters. You don't want ammonia or nitrites and nitrates should stay below 20.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top