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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got some rotala for my tank two weeks ago. They guy at my lfs said it was rotala indica but after research and looking at it closely I'm starting to think its rotala rotundifolia. Let me know what you guys think. I have had it for two weeks and haven't had any new growth. Got it in a 20 long with a planted 24/7 on dimmed mode. Dosing liquid ei ferts and excel daily. Also have a fluval co2 setup. I also got no new growth out of my bacopa carolinania which I also got 2 weeks ago. Have seachem root tabs under them also
 

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When grown submersed they are very easy to tell apart (R. indica vs R. rotundifolia)

R. indica will have short rounded (oval/circular) leaves while R. rotundifolia has longer "needle" shaped leaves.

For some reason they are still mislabeled to this day. (I guess because the emersed growth forms look similar)
You will see R. indica being called 'true' R. indica or by the name of Ammania sp. 'bonsai' to differentiate from R. rotundifolia

Both are pretty common. R. rotundifolia grows fast and very easy. R. indica, in my experience is still fairly easy, but doesn't grow nearly as fast as the other (it's not really a slow grower itself though).


EDIT: just saw the picture after posting. Can you take a pic from above as well? Looks like you might have another plant species mixed in there (the bigger leaved plant...TWO for ONE! :)). Might be another plant species mixed in there as well (green spade leaf plant), would like to see a closer picture of all the leaves to confirm.
 

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Hmm... I don't feel I have the necessary knowledge to ID for certain. Those "giant" lower leaves (originally thought it was another plant mixed in the bunch, but overhead pics show it's the same stems) seriously look like a different plant species to me (like a Ludwigia lower half, Rotala upper). Can't say I've seen the leaves get that big and long, in low light or high light, immersed or emersed (which looks completely different). Maybe I'm just not getting a grasp on the size ratio from the pic and the leaves are not nearly as big as I am making myself believe? Let's see what @Tinanti thinks

edit: Might help if you can get a pic of a stem separated and not cluttered in the bunch (just to take a pic), so we can better see the leaf arrangement (opposite, whorled, alternating leaves)

Hopefully I am wrong as I've never seen a "Frankenstein" plant (different than hybrid) quite like that. Thinking it still might be R. rotundifolia or one of it's other variations with leaves from two significantly different growing environments.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hmm... I don't feel I have the necessary knowledge to ID for certain. Those "giant" lower leaves (originally thought it was another plant mixed in the bunch, but overhead pics show it's the same stems) seriously look like a different plant species to me (like a Ludwigia lower half, Rotala upper). Can't say I've seen the leaves get that big and long, in low light or high light, immersed or emersed (which looks completely different). Maybe I'm just not getting a grasp on the size ratio from the pic and the leaves are not nearly as big as I am making myself believe? Let's see what @Tinanti thinks

edit: Might help if you can get a pic of a stem separated and not cluttered in the bunch (just to take a pic), so we can better see the leaf arrangement (opposite, whorled, alternating leaves)

Hopefully I am wrong as I've never seen a "Frankenstein" plant (different than hybrid) quite like that. Thinking it still might be R. rotundifolia or one of it's other variations with leaves from two significantly different growing environments.
Here's another pic. Most of the bottom half of the plant is rotting and dying away but the top seems to look good
 

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Glad I was completely wrong about the plant. I've still never seen the lower half, bigger, wider leaves like that though.

As for plant care, it's a easy plant and fast grower too. Haven't found it to really need any particular thing. Just give it some time to adapt.

I guess since you haven't had any growth, maybe you could propagate some of the tops and let the healthy tops root, and they should adjust and grow in no time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Glad I was completely wrong about the plant. I've still never seen the lower half, bigger, wider leaves like that though.

As for plant care, it's a easy plant and fast grower too. Haven't found it to really need any particular thing. Just give it some time to adapt.

I guess since you haven't had any growth, maybe you could propagate some of the tops and let the healthy tops root, and they should adjust and grow in no time.
Do you think I Should cut the top half that is healthy and replant those and throw away the bottom half that is rotting or leave the bottom still planted and just propagate the top healthy half?
 

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Hmm, I don't get notifications on some quoted posts for some reason.

You could do that if you wanted.

Just incase the bottoms are still viable though, I would prefer to cut the top half, leaving maybe one or two healthy leaves on the bottoms. Leave the bottoms where they are and plant the tops somewhere else.
 

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What used to be called R. indica they're sayings is actually a version of R. rotundifolia and what used to be known as Ammania bonsai is now officially classified as R. indica. Note that most nurseries and fish stores have not caught up with this. Why they decided to call it indica when A. bonsai was reclassified, I don't know. It would have saved a LOT of confusion if they had just called it R. bonsai or something. :p Anyway, true R. indica looks nothing at all like R. rotundifolia.

Rotala indica - Indian toothcup - Flowgrow Aquatic Plant Database

Rotala rotundifolia - Dwarf Rotala - Flowgrow Aquatic Plant Database
 

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You could do either. Propagate now (would reduce some shading from the taller bunch). Personally I would probably let those new bottom stems grow out 3 or so more inches before replanting them. Letting them grow to 6-8" or so would give them better results in growing once propagated. Either way is fine though (now or later), they will still grow.

Are the tops seeing much new growth?
If not it's probably best to propagate the tops. Even if they are growing well, I would still probably replant the tops.
Don't be afraid to spread the stems out, would look better and give the plants a little better growth.
 
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