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:help:eek:k here the story i bought a 125 gallon tank a week ago i am writing this on the 9th day ok here the big issue I DID NOT CYCLE MY AQUARUIAM !!!!!.:iamwithst i started adding fish on the 3rd day (i used one of my old aquarium filters to speed the process up of building the necessary bacteria NOTE it did not work.) i have a mixture of MBUNA chichlids and 2 Peacocks they get along fine ... everything seemed fine untill day 7 . I have had a break out of ICK and cloudy eye disease. NO fish have died yet ... I have been treating the tank with some malachite green and malafix for the pop eye an fungus. its working on some of my fish but it just seems soon as i get one healed up another one is breaking out with it what can i do? i dont want to lose any of my babies!!! i have been isolating the sick fish and putting them in a separate tank to recover and then putting them in my established 55 gallon the only problem is i have some babies in their from another pair and i don't want to many big fish in there. i have treated the 125 tank and the sick tank whith the medicine. I KNOW MY BIG MISTAKE WAS NOT CYCLING THE TANK BUT NOW THAT I KNOW THAT WHAT CAN I DO TO GET THESE ISSUES CLEARED UP. here are my tank readings as of day 9

nitrate - 80 ppm(danger high)

nitrite - 10 ppm (high also)

hardness - 300 ppm (i live in SA tx we have hard water)

alkalinity - 180 ppm

PH - 8.4 (i have chichlids so this reading is ok
:iamwithst
ammonia - 0 (this is the only thing that is good but its expected for day 9)

ONE more thing - i added some drift wood i found in canyon lake texas one piece i used safely in my 55 gallon with no issues. the other peice i hadnt used before but im not sure if they are contributing factors to the issue.

Another thing- about day 7 i noticed small white dots on the glass of my aquarium looks like algae but it been a while since Ive had to deal with these little white spots.. even in my 155 my algae eater would just keep that in control....
 

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Hello jcardo2980,

First off, this is a planted tank forum. Although we almost all fish keepers too, this is not really the forum for diagnosing and toubleshooting disease and cycle issues.

However, not to cut you loose, it seems that you made one of the biggest errors of the hobby, rushing. Cycling is very important and you should know that especially with cichlids.

Now you are in a tailspin, treating with chemicals that are probably killing off the very bacteria you need to get the cycle back on track. In addition, during the treatment of ich, most fish have a lose of appetite. If you are continuing to feed, the excess uneaten food may also be causing issues.

My suggestion, nuke the tank and start over. Drain off all the water, rinse and wash the substrate and chuck all the filter media in the filters. Their are a number of steps that can be done to clean and prep the driftwood, I suggest searching the net for some recipes. Baking the wood is one option. A 125 gallon fish tank is no joke. Can you ride it out? Sure. Do you want to risk infecting fish all over again?? ich never really goes away and usually rears its ugle head when you have drastic imbalance in a tank. If you can't stabilize this 125, its just going to come back again.

Depending on how old your fish are, you may be able to nurse them back, but I would get them out of that 125 and into some clean water, raise up that temp and use what ever medicinal methods you need to cure the illnesses. I highly suggest that all fish stay out of the 125 until you are absolutly positive you have cured the illnesses.

Cycling can be assisted by adding plants, which will act as biological filters helping to breakdown ionized ammonia (ammonia), nitrites and nitrates.

You can also run some activated carbon though your filters to help remove some of impurities you may have.
 

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75% WC and up your temp. Your fish will be fine. Add amquel or prime @dose +1/4 to get everything back where you want it. Unfortunately for us cichlid owners, plants sometimes aren't the best advice considering the size of the fish and the tendency for the plants to get uprooted. However, your babies will need cover, so boiling or baking your driftwood and getting it back in there is a good idea. Try to not mess with chemicals too much when it comes to Ich. WC's, temp upping, and a little aquarium salt goes a long way.
 

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Unfortunately for us cichlid owners, plants sometimes aren't the best advice considering the size of the fish and the tendency for the plants to get uprooted.
Completely disagree.

Plant selection is the key. Rhizome plants do not require substrate rooting and these plants can be tied down or held in place. I have been keeping cichlids for years, both African and New World with great success. African's, of course, are like 3 year olds on 10 lbs of chocalate.

But again, plant selection and proper placement is all you need.
 

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Completely disagree.

Plant selection is the key. Rhizome plants do not require substrate rooting and these plants can be tied down or held in place. I have been keeping cichlids for years, both African and New World with great success. African's, of course, are like 3 year olds on 10 lbs of chocalate.

But again, plant selection and proper placement is all you need.
+1 on rhizome plants and plants that can be tied down. These however are not usually the greatest oxygenators/nutrient uptakers. Just look nice.
 

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+1 on rhizome plants and plants that can be tied down. These however are not usually the greatest oxygenators/nutrient uptakers. Just look nice.
This is a baseless statement. They are not nutrient uptakers like stem plants, but still provide nutrient uptake to the level that I would still consider them biological filters.

The op is looking for a remedy to not only help the fish but to put it back on track as a result of a busted cycle. I offered my opinion for potential solution from evidence that works from my own experience.
 

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As staley said, increase temp to speed up ick lifecycle. Ick is only vulnerable to treatment in waterborne state, so you want the little devils to cycle through quickly.

Switch to one of the treaments that are bio filter safe. I think I used one called IckGuard once that worked well with no I'll effects.

Ick is almost always present but healthy fauna resist. Stressed fish succumb.

My humble advice....

Don't panic. Ick is already there, more change will just maje things worse. Increase tp to 85, 2 degree per hour increments. Ensure lots of surface agitation to keep water oxygenated. Adding sn airstone wouldn't hurt. Treat with IckGuard or similar for 3 days after all evidence of ick is gone. DON'T stop any of this if ick vanishes, you need to continue at least 3,4 days longer until the last of the buggers cycle through the waterborne stage.

It will be ok.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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if this tank is not planted, i would treat it like a regular cichlid tank and add a healthy amount of salt... also watch the melafix it does something to the oxygen in the aquarium (i think it lowers it or makes it less processable) that coupled with the high ammonia could become a death sentance...
 

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This is a baseless statement. They are not nutrient uptakers like stem plants, but still provide nutrient uptake to the level that I would still consider them biological filters.

The op is looking for a remedy to not only help the fish but to put it back on track as a result of a busted cycle. I offered my opinion for potential solution from evidence that works from my own experience.
as you are the moderator, i will concede. :) jus tryin to help.
 

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Add Dr. Tim's One and Only or Tetra Safe Start. These are the only products I know that have the actual nitrifying bacteria.

Do at least a 50% water change every day (twice a day would be better) until you can get one of those two products. Stop all medicines and add activated carbon to remove the medicines. They can interfere with the growth of the bacteria. Use a labeled dose of Prime or Amquel Plus to lock up the nitrite between water changes. (Read the label, you might need a double dose or more)

Add NaCl. Table salt is fine. I would start with 1 tablespoon per 5 gallons, and double it if the fish will handle it. Do it this way: Dissolve the salt (25 tablespoons) in some water and add it slowly over several hours. The next day add some more. With every water change calculate how much salt is in there and add that to the new water. For example, after the first dose there is a tablespoon per 5 gallons, so a 60 gallon water change calls for 12 tablespoons of salt. If you went with 2 tablespoons per 5 gallons then a 50% water change will call for 24 tablespoons of salt in the new water.
Salt will kill Ich, and will reduce the amount of nitrite crossing the gills into the blood, and eases stress.

I would assume many of the fish 'diseases' are really problems due to the nitrogen toxins:
Ammonia burns the gills, the eyes, and the tender tissue in the fins, and elsewhere. This can make the fish look like they have cloudy eye, fin rot and breathing problems.
Nitrite enters the blood and makes the blood not carry oxygen very well. It is called Brown Blood Disease. Google it. It also makes the fish act like they are having breathing problems.
Either or both of these will make the fish behave in a stressed manner: little or no appetite, lethargic and piping (gulping air at the surface).
The stress of being poisoned with either or both these can make the fish unthrifty for the rest of their lives, if they survive. They can be less resistant to disease and parasites.

Adding plants of any sort can help, even of the fish eat them now or later. I would float cuttings from any tank, add whatever you have. Stems, floaters, whatever. The shade is less stress for the fish, and the plants, even cuttings, will continue to photosynthesize, helping with the nitrogen problems. The plants will not like the salt, so remove plants that are looking sad, and add more. Do not put any permanant plants in there while the salt level is so high.

Adding some cycled media from another tank is a good way to jump start a new tank, but as an example: If the tank it came from had 20" of fish, and you took 25% of the media from the filter, then at the max it MIGHT handle 5" of fish. Actually, less. There are a lot of bacteria on the rocks, gravel, driftwood and other things, so in moving 25% of the filter media you were not even moving 25% of the bacteria. (If the old filter you got the media from had been in storage for a while there would not be any beneficial bacteria in the media)
Using some filter media from a healthy, cycled tank is a great way to jump start a fishless cycle, but will not instantly give your tank all the nitrifying bacteria it needs to fully support a tank full of fish.

Ignore the little white dots on the glass.

Leave the driftwood there. It probably has some beneficial bacteria on it, and if it was bringing in any disease and parasites it has done so. Removing it and boiling it after it has been in the tank a week will not reverse the introduction of disease or parasites.
 

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Plus 1 with the large water changes. Do at least 2 50% water changes 3 days appart and that should take care of the nitrate spike, though it actually calls my attention that you have such high nitrate ammount in just a few days. You mention your "dirty filter" did not work, however based on your numbers, having 0 ammonia in less than 10 days and almost no nitrites in the same time actually tells you that it indeed is working.

Nitrate is not supposed to spike, so I´m wondering if your test is not accurate or perhaps you are getting a wrong result. I´d try testing again.

Take the "uncured" driftwood out asap, I actually think this is a root of the problem, it might be that it has fungus or is rotting in your tank.

Add some anacharis (elodea) in bunches to help cycling. The plants will absorb the nitrates very fast, and once you tank is fully cycled you can take them out if you don´t want to keep them.

Ich can be cured by raising the temp. For the fungus problems it is best to isolate the sick fish in a QT tank and treat them separately
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Reponse to everyone replys

hello everyone thank you for all the advice i amazed at how fast i got really awsome responses . I am doing the water changes today and buying some heaters to raise temperature and adding salt. thank you guys for your answers i will keep everyone updated on how things turn out.... im still debating wheather to leave the drift wood or take it out ? i guess this is a matter of opinion. thanx again
 

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I use Seachem Stability to start tanks. Works fabulously for me, however you do need to babysit the water for a week and do water changes if levels aren't optimal.
 

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Your driftwood shouldn't be causing or contributing to any of your water parameter issues unless it's soft wood and actually rotting in the tank.

You need to do as many water changes as frequently as it takes to maintain less than 20ppm nitrates and 0.25 or less ammonia and nitrites.

I agree with Diana that salt is a good decision as it will address both ich and nitrite poisoning. The salt won't be great for plants, but personally, I'd get the ich taken care of before worrying about plants.
 

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I am doing the water changes today and buying some heaters to raise temperature and adding salt.
I can only repeat what has already been said, but you did have a heater(s) before now right? I would personaly just redo the tank. But that is me. Make sure you are doing a good amount of WC! A 25%? WC every day should help with your cycling problem.

Welcome to TPT BTW!
 

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Posted is a reply provided to me by D. Walstad regarding salt treatment.

Nitrite should be kept below 0.01 ppm for chronic effects. A one-time addition of salt (1 level teaspoon uniodized salt per 10 gal) will take care of your nitrite levels quite handily. This salt concentration (about 0.015%) should not hurt plants. To make sure salt gets quickly disbursed in the tank water, I would dissolve the salt in some water and then add the resulting salt solution to the tank.
 

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That level of salt may be sufficient for nitrite poisoning, but is probably too low to treat the ich, though. I'd dose one tbsp per gallon of salt to treat ich with salt-tolerant fish like African cichlids. I use 1 tsp/gallon for salt-sensitive fish like tetras and catfish.
 
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