The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,012 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Riparium plants are planted in individual little "pots" which hang partly in the tank water, and like all plants, they need feeding. One way to feed them, like for submersed plants, is to fertilize the water in the tank. Based on what I see, this is not optimum fertilizing. Another way is to fertilize the planter mix in each planter.

I'm wondering if Osmocote would be a good fertilizer for this use. Osmocote is pellets of fertilizer coated with a material that only allows a small amount of the nutrient to escape in any given time - a time release fertilizer. Of course, being a terrestrial plant fertilizer, Osmocote contains a lot of ammonia/urea as part of its nitrogen component. And, ammonia and urea are not recommended for aquariums.

Does anyone have any thoughts about how Osmocoat would work as the fertilizer for Riparium planters? I'm asking because Tom Barr has suggested that Osmocoat under an aquarium substrate would be a good way to get a nutrient laden substrate, partly because the nutrients can't dump into the water, but are only slowly released, thus won't do any harm. This suggests to me that it would be ideal for riparium planters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,012 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
No opinions? Today I found Osmocote at Home Depot, and got a lifetime supply - 3 pounds - for $10. I have now poked 2 little balls into a few of my riparium planters to see what happens. The Osmocote I found, the only one sold there in less than 5 lifetimes supply, doesn't have trace elements in it, just NPK, so I'm not sure this is a valid test.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,750 Posts
I understood that Osmocote works by osmosis, hence the brand name. I think that it is not advisable to use it in very wet situations because it is apt to dump all of the fertilizer in a short period of time. I have heard of problems with this effect and nursery stock subjected to wet conditions. Osmocote should work best in media with moderate amounts of moisture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,012 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I understood that Osmocote works by osmosis, hence the brand name. I think that it is not advisable to use it in very wet situations because it is apt to dump all of the fertilizer in a short period of time. I have heard of problems with this effect and nursery stock subjected to wet conditions. Osmocote should work best in media with moderate amounts of moisture.
I read a lot of the information on the Osmocote website and it appeared from that that very moist conditions would not cause a dump of nutrients. Of course, this is not the situation that Osmocote was developed for, so they don't come right out and say it will work for marsh conditions. In any case it is now only in some planters in my 15H tank, those that don't seem to be doing anything now, so at worst it doesn't work well, and I get green water in the tank. My question will then be answered, even though I won't like the answer.

Extrapolating the bottle recommended dosage of one teaspoon for a 8 inch pot, I figured the small riparium planters would need from 1/32nd to 1/16th tsp, and that looked like around two little balls. I didn't get out my micrometer to measure the balls, though:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,750 Posts
With such small quantities as those even if it did release quickly I imagine that it wouldn't have a real bad effect. And the substrate in the planter and the plant roots would also impede escape of the nutrients out into the aquarium water.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top