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There are some Caladiums that grow in the wild as marginals in saturated soils, but I imagine that few of the hybrids would be very hardy in conditions like that.

Asiatica used to have a species Caladium that was a big plant with dark green arrowhead-shaped leaves with many round pink and white spots. I can't remember the name but I do recall reading it described as growing in wet streamside conditions in nature. It would be hard to use except in a big tank, but maybe one could also control the size or use smaller offsets. I gotta go try and dig up the name of that plant. The local zoo has one growing in their big dartfrog vivarium and the roots are down in the water.

Asiatica in general has some pretty amazing plants.

Check this out...

http://www.blackjungle.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=BJTS&Product_Code=TP-CLPLC&Category_Code=RC

According to the description there, unlike most Caladium that one does not go winter-dormant. I might have try to get it if I can find any references to growing it as a marginal.
 

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That caladium palacioanum is certainly a great looking one, that would fit in very well in a riparium, but at $30 each, plus shipping, that is a lot to spend without knowing it would do well. I like to limit my "gambles" to under $10, if possible. That's the beauty of Home Depot's house plant table - CHEAP!
 

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You oughta try out one or two Caladium from Home Depot. It seems like I saw a couple of those wild new hybrids there recently. Those new ones are bound to start getting around and showing up at grocery stores and wherever else too.

I see that Tom Croat, the aroid expert from Missouri Botanical Garden, named that Caladium palacioanum. I had met Dr. Croat at the aroid show in Miami. I should send him a note to see if he has habitat data for that species.
 

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Hydro, if you ever come across one of those C. palacioanum, I call first dibs on baby plants :hihi:! We've sold Caladiums as pond marginal plants before at my work. I think they were just the regular Elephant Ear kind that gets huge, but I know they do well in marginal conditions as long as they get their dormancy in winter.
 

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Hey you got it man. Doesn't it have cool leaves? I need to write Dr. Croat to see what he might have to say about it. I see that that C. palacioanum is described as having petioles 12-14" long. There are so many cool plants that are just a little too big for my 55-gallon or my 65. I really gotta get something bigger like a 90-gallon. A 110 Tall could be good too.
 

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That caladium palacioanum is certainly a great looking one, that would fit in very well in a riparium, but at $30 each, plus shipping, that is a lot to spend without knowing it would do well. I like to limit my "gambles" to under $10, if possible. That's the beauty of Home Depot's house plant table - CHEAP!
See if you could get Caladium humboltii. It has small, white variegated foliage.

There are small, green with markings, red and variegated varieties of some Bromeliads ( notably in Neoregelia genus), which you could possibly use on the side walls, or driftwood/rock. I have a large collection of this plants.
 

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EdwardN, Have you grown that C. humboltii specifically in wet conditions? That one would look super in a riparium down beneath a larger plant. With those white leaves it would pair well with a dark green background Spathiphyllum.
 

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I don't think this ( and other) Caladium would withstand 'wet feet' for longer than a bief while, but ypu could make some provision for a corm or two on a side wall or a net pot attached to anything above 'v.wet' level and mask it with a little Sphagnum, which itself could possibly 'resurect' itself in such moist condition.
 

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Ok it took a lot of Googling but I found two species that are definitely described as being associated with wet soil habitats:
  1. Caladium clavatum
  2. C. steudnerifolium

Here's a shot of steudnerifolium...

http://media.photobucket.com/image/Caladium%20steudnerifolium/HabloPorArboles/Caladium1.jpg

...and here's a picture of clavatum...

http://media.photobucket.com/image/Caladium%20clavatum/HabloPorArboles/DSCN1274.jpg

They both get really big. You would need to use a big tank for them. clavatum is the one I was thinking of before.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Both of those caladium would do well as a single leaf umbrella over my 65 gallon tank! I had something a bit smaller in mind:icon_mrgr

EdwardN, I will be googling both of those plants as soon as I post this. And, tomorrow I may head back to HD to see what caladiums they have. As I recall they had several, but all were the very large leaf varieties. I also can visit an Ace Hardware near me that has a good selection of houseplants, and a plant nursery not too far away also with a good selection.

EDIT: http://www.blackjungle.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?store_code=BJTS&screen=PROD&product_code=TP-CHMW
http://www.asiaticanursery.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=plants.plantDetail&plant_id=734 Right in my price range.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I don't think this ( and other) Caladium would withstand 'wet feet' for longer than a bief while, but ypu could make some provision for a corm or two on a side wall or a net pot attached to anything above 'v.wet' level and mask it with a little Sphagnum, which itself could possibly 'resurect' itself in such moist condition.
One way to use such a plant would be to use a standard riparium planter cup, but mount it just above the water level. Then water it by hand periodically. IN my case, when I do water changes I temporarily raise the water level about 1/2 inch, so that could suffice for watering it. Hydrophyte, do you think this would work?

EDIT: I don't know if this website is correct, but according to it you could use both caladiums and impatiens as marginal plants - http://www.ponddoc.com/WhatsUpDoc/Plants/EnchantingPlants.htm Now, I am getting interested!

EDIT: http://www2.mailordercentral.com/pwg/products.asp?dept=22&pagenumber=1 lists caladiums as suitable for pond margins! Maybe all caladiums could be treated as such.
 

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One way to use such a plant would be to use a standard riparium planter cup, but mount it just above the water level. Then water it by hand periodically. IN my case, when I do water changes I temporarily raise the water level about 1/2 inch, so that could suffice for watering it. Hydrophyte, do you think this would work?
That would work fine. One concern that I see would be that the plant in the raised cup would then be higher up relative to its neighbors. Whether or not this would look alright would depend upon their relaitve sizes and how they all fit together.

You could also just have the base of the planter down in the water, with water wicking up through the planter media and maintaining it constantly moist. This kind of setup would give the roots a lot more oxygen than if completely underwater.


these reminds me of elephant ears... there are some really nice ones too.
http://www.asiaticanursery.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=plants.plantDetail&plant_id=679
There are a number of cool elephant ear or taro plants in Alocasia, Colocasia and Xanthosoma that should work well for this kind of growing, although most need to have some elbow room in a larger tank. Here is one of my favorites, Colocasia fallax 'Silver Dollar':

 

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Discussion Starter #15
A couple of weeks ago I visited my HD store and bought a bag of 3 tubers of Caladium candidum because they had them and at $4 or so per bag I didn't care if they failed to grow for me. I planted one in a small planter cup, which just did have enough room for it. Today I noticed roots growing and showing through the plastic. Now, tonight I see a tiny sprout sticking out of the Flourite gravel. I think its going to work! I keep the planter a little high, so only the bottom half or less is under water. I need to experiment a bit more after it gets started, to see how it does with more of it under water.

This is a pretty large leaf variety of Caladium, so I may not want to use it in one of my big tank. But, if it does well I will be in the market for a good miniature one this Spring. Once this one grows out so it is more visible I will post a pic.
 

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Hey I heard back from Dr. Croat about that rare species Caladium palacioanum. He had observed it growing as an upland plant near cliffs. It is a pretty neat plant, but apparently not associated with wet soils.
 

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Hey I heard back from Dr. Croat about that rare species Caladium palacioanum. He had observed it growing as an upland plant near cliffs. It is a pretty neat plant, but apparently not associated with wet soils.
That makes me hesitate to buy some of the nice looking ones at Asiatic, not that their $22 shipping cost didn't already discourage me. Being a near ignoramous about plants in general, I assumed that all caladium varieties would work in the same environment. Last night I had an order to Asiatic all set to push the "buy" button, when I looked at the shipping cost - apparently they employ several people just to package anything I might buy:icon_mrgr
 

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They must have heard you coming.

That vendor does charge a bit for S & H, and their plants aren't cheap, but I'll tell you they have really high quality material and a lot of it is rare and/or never before offered in the US.

I have my eye on several selections from Asiatica that look promising as riparium subjects. I really want to try to get these:


I'm pretty sure about the suitability of the spath and the Schismatoglottis, but somewhat less certain about the Dieffenbanchia. Although I think that most Dieffenbanchia do grow in moist to wet soils.

I wonder if it would be cost-effective to try to do a combination order and then split up the material(?). Would you be interested in looking into that?
 

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They must have heard you coming.

That vendor does charge a bit for S & H, and their plants aren't cheap, but I'll tell you they have really high quality material and a lot of it is rare and/or never before offered in the US.

I have my eye on several selections from Asiatica that look promising as riparium subjects. I really want to try to get these:


I'm pretty sure about the suitability of the spath and the Schismatoglottis, but somewhat less certain about the Dieffenbanchia. Although I think that most Dieffenbanchia do grow in moist to wet soils.

I wonder if it would be cost-effective to try to do a combination order and then split up the material(?). Would you be interested in looking into that?
Yes, I would be interested. I'm really interested in getting just two Caladium bulbs, a couple of the miniature ones. That's probably about 4 ounces or less, and a box the size of an ear ring gift box. I have no problem with paying normal Priority Mail shipping costs, but nothing like what Asiatic wants. And, I do realize that they are a very high quality operation - I'm just a penny pincher at times. If you decide this is cost effective let me know and I will PM you the ones I'm interested in.
 

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OK if you think try to help me to remember. It will be a few weeks before I can move on it.

Do you have the caladiums in mind specifically for riparium culture? If you like I could also ask at Aroid-L about growing requirements for the ones you are considering.
 
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