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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!

Long story short, I came across some crypts still alive and kicking in a pretty much abandoned aquarium. In an attempt to culture them back I set up an emersed 10 gallon set-up for them and a few other plants. About a week ago I made the mistake of leaving them in direct sunlight and when I came home from work most of the plants have shriveled up and wilted. I brought the tank back into the shade but the wilted plants just gave up on life and molded over.

But today, when I was outside I realized that crypts have rhizomes which are biologically designed to survive meltings and extreme weathers, so I dug out what root systems the crypts still had left. Aside from a few rotting roots, and no leaves whatsoever, the bare rhizomes still looked alive and somewhat greenish.

Not all hope has been lost, so I cut off what rotting appendages the rhizomes have and threw them in a ziplock bag with some very moist paper tissues and blew some air into the bag before I closed them off. Then I placed them under my T-8 6500k vivarium light fixture. I hope this will have the same effect as a high humidity mini green house and will offer the rhizomes optimal conditions for them to bounce back into life! This is a technique I often notice people use as a way to propagate plant cuttings so I have high hopes for success.

I did some research also, and found that other people have multiple ways of salvaging their crypt rhizomes. Some simply float it in their aquariums, or lay them in a pot of damp peat to help their rhizome cuttings get started. I'm sure there are some rhizomes still in the 10 gallon just waiting to be salvage and I can experiment with every technique possible! My plan is to save these crypts and transplant them into my vivarium's water feature :)

But the main question remains. In everyone's opinion, what is the best way to culture bare crypt rhizomes emersed?
 

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Partially bury them in a fertile substrate, give them plenty of light, and keep the humidity up. You should see new leaves form in a few weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay, I found 2 more rhizomes (for a total of 6) and partially planted them in a cup with some Miracle Gro Organic dirt mix I still have lying around and capped it with some peat and sand. Covered the cup with some saran wrap too for safe measure. I'll note the date and will probably report back with results.

There are 4 rhizomes in the ziplock bag ATM, and I was thinking of throwing 2 in the vivarium where the substrate is raised up to meet the water level and swampy damp. But I will probably hold on that thought as the area aforementioned is kind of in a shady spot with less light than is what probably needed.
 

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What i have done with mine before is cut the rhizome and just lay it on the soil and in no time leaves appear. Ive gotten several plants out of just one small section on rhizome. Currently doing this same thing with c. pygmeae that i recieved a few weeks back in less then stellar shape. Its already sprouted new leaves
 

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Hi there,
I know this is an old post. I am a new user and don't know how to post a new thread. I received a bunch of pygmy chain sword and they look less than healthy... The roots seem alive and well. No green leaves. Should I plant them anyway? Or should I toss them. Any help/advice would be appreciated!
 
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