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So I have come to terms with the pros/cons of spending money on a good regulator, and will likely go with a GLA or Rex setup. However, I'm still curious about more economical alternatives. So...

Would it solve the issue of dependability tp simply invest in a good needle valve to go on a cheaper regulator like the Milwaukee or Azoo regs selling for cheap on ebay?

I am under the impression that the only significant draw-backs of buying a cheap reg like these is the in-precise needle valves... are there other good reasons to go the more expensive route?
 

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I don't have the azoo or the milwaukee. I have a regulator from Rex. From what I've heard the Azoo is similar quality as Rex's once you put a good need;e valve on it. From posts, I would suggest avoiding the Milwaukee. Rex's regulator is a Cornilus body with good components.

You can find this body on ebay too and acquire the needle valve, solenoid and connectors to build you own for less.
 

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The regulator you have linked to would work fine for our purposes (single stage CO2 regulator). However, as S&KGray mentioned, there are some cheap Victor dual stage regulators on eBay currently.
 

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Okay so this thread is doing some good, i.e. potentially saving me (and readers) some money. So lets throw a hypothetical in here...

What do we think about picking up THIS cheap reg, and buying the needle valve and solenoid elsewhere to build our own?

That would work fine. I'm currently using a Draught Technologies regulator that I attached a paintball input that I purchased from a brewing site with a Fabco Needle Valve and Clippard solenoid. This setup works well. Whenever I get an aquarium stand that can store a standard co2 cylinder, I can change the input for a cga320 input. I couldn't use a dual stage regulator with my paintball tanks cuz they would be a little top heavy.
 

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All a regulator has to do is control the downstream pressure to the value you want, even as the CO2 tank pressure changes. Any regulator that will do that is usable. And, as a bonus, such regulators should let you change that downstream pressure one or two psi at a time if you wish to do so. Milwaukee regulators sometimes fail to do these things. If the cheap one mentioned above will do them, it is a great find.
 
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