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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The replacment on my Milwaukee regulator died, Milwaukee was good enough to replace it. However, upon installing the identical solenoid onto the regulator assembly I can't get it sealed. I'm using an appropriate pattern to tighten the screws and I can't figure out why this one won't seal.

For those who haven't disassembled this stuff before the soleniod seat is brass to brass. There wasn't a seal of any sort in the old one when I disassembled it. Anybody have any ideas?
 

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Anytime you have metal to metal contact with NPT (National Pipe Thread) you have to have some sort of sealant. I use non-hardening pipe dope (pipe joint compound). You can get it at any hardware store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Rex, there's no thread to thread contact here, this is the interface between the metal portion of the solenoid and the brass block that the solenoid mounts into. I was nervous about putting anything near the switching mechanism but I'm going to have to try it (small amount of pipe dope).
 

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I'm not sure I understand how its leaking.


This what you have? The black bit thats hanging down is the solenoid. It's usually replaced as an assembly. Its attached to the other plumbing component with pipe threads. Like Rex said, a little pipe dope works great.

The way you describe it though, it sounds like they just sent a coil? Its the electrical part, and usually just slips over the area where the valve and armature are housed. Held on with screws, a nut or an E-clip. Not usually an area that causes a gas leak.

Anyways... brass on brass is a poor joint unless its all perfectly flat and smooth. Perhaps there's a copper ring or gasket? Its easy to over look or drop an o-ring, and its easy to over torque small fittings and deform a sealing area. I've done both :-S
So...a few thoughts that might be usefull.
You could try adding some anerobic gasket maker like LOCTITE® 515™ Gasket Eliminator
http://www.ellsworth.com/display/productdetail.html?productid=1004&Tab=Products If the mating surfaces are warped badly you could file or sand them flat first. A fine file and finner sandpaper in a criss-cross pattern. Good luck.
 

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It seems like you are just replacing the solenoid coil, which is the solenoid, and not the solenoid valve, which should be replaced. Those valves fail, in my experience, in the mechanical portion (the brass part) and not the electrical coil (the black part). But, I don't recall a seal between those two parts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Its only the electrical portion of the solenoid I'm replacing. You're right, loctite is the solution. I was amazed when I took the old one apart, there was no o-ring, no deformable metal (other than brass) and no sealing material like loctite or glue of any sort. Really strange!

Anyway, I have it close to sealed and will give the loctite a go. I'd come to that conclusion on my own but Home Depot didn't have it tonight...I'll have to hit the auto parts joint tomorrow.
 

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I had to take out the bubble counter and connect the CO2 tubing directly to the needle valve.
 
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