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Hey, I need to remove a part on my new to me co2 tank, I'm not sure what it's called so making it difficult to find answers. As seen in the pics I need to remove the interior section of the tank valve, the female threaded part so that the male part on the regulator can fit inside. If anyone has any advice I'd appreciate the help, thanks.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes I think you're correct. After inspecting it I see it's not actually a removable piece, it appeared that way but I see it's just a ridge or indentation for a gasket possibly. It was a 5$ regulator from a Chinese store so I knew there was a catch. The reg went on about two threads and leaked so I put in some silicone for band-aid fix which sealed up nicely until I can get a proper regulator. For now I'll only run it while I'm home.
 

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I agree with the post by @PlantedRich. In addition the pressure in a CO2 tank is extremely high. I would consider it unsafe to operate it at all with an incorrect fitting.

Best thing to do is get the regulator you really need. It will cost you, but it will work well, and should last.
 

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A bit more info to save some trouble later. I notice there is pipe tape on the tank fitting. This is a different type fitting that doesn't need the tape. A standard CGA320 fitting is what all the people who fill the tank will expect so don't change that part. But when you find the correct fitting regulator, you may want to change out the fitting to meet the tank. For instance you may find a reg with a CGA 580 fitting. This fitting can be unscrewed from the reg and a CGA320 installed for around $10 in the US. But when the two correct fittings are used, there should be a washer laid flat between the two. The little groove then helps to seal things as you screw them tight. The seal is made at the washer and gas should never be out to the threads. Much like the washer on a water hose where the threads are not the seal. Putting tape on this joint can create a future problem as the threads cut bit of the tape and it can wind up getting into the gas flow and stopper some small little point. Just better not to have it there so that it can't get where it shouldn't?
Washers are available most places that deal with gas. This is one online:
Learn To Brew Nylon Washers for Co2 Regulators, Set of 6: Beer Keg Regulators: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific
 
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