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I'm planning a new tank and really want to include a couple red plants attached to some rock or driftwood. I can't seem to find any that will do well not planted in substrate. Any recommendations?
 

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lagenandra meeboldii red Not sure if you would find this in the US. but you can consider this plant too.
Oh yes we have that plant state side. I actually just got a specimen of it and I'm really looking forward to it growing in.

I was under the impression that it should be buried in substrate though.

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a lot of stem plants actually do pretty well as floaters. Now they won't last long tied to a rock, that part will deteriorate and you'll have to keep trimming it and re-tying it down. I'm doing something similar right now, but in a nano so I can keep the stem to like 4 inches tall. Plus I have a rock crack to cram it into so I don't have to tie it. It looks like it's "growing" from the substrate but it never really roots.
 

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There are limited choice of red epiphytes and forcing plants into unnatural epiphytes is not durable and requires more effort than worth it. Have you thought about securing red plants in pots and hide behind rock or crevices of driftwood. I use hydroponic pots that allow roots to grow out and the black color can easily be camouflaged.
 

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Oh yes we have that plant state side. I actually just got a specimen of it and I'm really looking forward to it growing in.

I was under the impression that it should be buried in substrate though.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
I got this plant recently. It sends off some wild color variations. I think you'll really enjoy it. I mean technically you could attach crypts and other plants to wood, but I think it's more practical and you'll get better more consistent growth if they're planted. Couple of pics from one plant.


 

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I got this plant recently. It sends off some wild color variations. I think you'll really enjoy it. I mean technically you could attach crypts and other plants to wood, but I think it's more practical and you'll get better more consistent growth if they're planted. Couple of pics from one plant.





Oooooh what is that?

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Oh, sorry maybe I didn't word my previous post correctly, those are both leaf color variations I'm getting from Lagenandra Meeboldii Red
Nope, re-reading the post on a computer rather than my cell phone revealed that the miss is on me.

Thanks for sharing! Are you growing this plant in a high energy tank?
 

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a lot of stem plants actually do pretty well as floaters. Now they won't last long tied to a rock, that part will deteriorate and you'll have to keep trimming it and re-tying it down. I'm doing something similar right now, but in a nano so I can keep the stem to like 4 inches tall. Plus I have a rock crack to cram it into so I don't have to tie it. It looks like it's "growing" from the substrate but it never really roots.
True. All stems can be grown as floater, as they can uptake nutrients entirely from the water column without rooting. But free floating is untidy and stems need to be anchored in one place to look good. I've tried gluing, lead weight, tie wrap, and suction cup but none last long. The bottom will rot away shortly and need to be re-attached more frequently than worth the effort. Anchoring in small pots is most durable, and can be hidden behind rock and wood. But stems grow tall indefinitely and need to be topped and replanted periodically. But replanting in pots is easier and less messy than replanting in substrate.
 
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