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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My java fern leaves are covered in plantlets. I understand that I will ultimately have to pluck them out and grow them out. My question is:

1. At what point do I pull the new plants out?

2. How do I take care of the new ones?

My current ferns are tied or wedged into driftwood. These new plantlets will be too small to attach to rocks/wood.

Thanks.

arnie
 

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Hmmm, I thought Java fern didn't like being planted in the substrate. Anyway, I have the same thing going on in my tank. In the past I just waited and the plantlets came loose eventually and I'd find them floating around the tank:hihi:
 

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Hmmm, I thought Java fern didn't like being planted in the substrate. Anyway, I have the same thing going on in my tank. In the past I just waited and the plantlets came loose eventually and I'd find them floating around the tank:hihi:
Agreed!

To: Arndogg,
Java Fern will not do as well when planted in the sub. Just wait until the little ones are about 3-4 leaves that are 3"-4" long then they should have some good root growth to get there own nutrients from the water column. You can attach the plantlettes to some wood pieces or small rocks with cotton thread wrapped around the rock/wood/"plant base" (called a rhizome). 3-4 passes with thread is fine and should fall off about the time that the plant has attached itself to the chosen wood or rock.

Also crushing and sprinkling some fert tabs on the fern roots will help them grow faster with good lighting.

GD
 

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You also could try my patented staple trick. Using a staple gun, shoot a few staples into your driftwood (lightly, so they don't go in all the way), then slide the rhizomes under and gently tap down the staple being careful not to crush the rhizome. Before too long they will rust over (NO it doesn't harm your water - I've have 50+ staples in my tank with no ill effect). The rust makes it so you can't even seem them.

If you ever do a corkboard wall, staples work MAGIC. You can just push them in with your fingers and the moss or ferns will stick. After awhile just tug them out.
 

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You also could try my patented staple trick. Using a staple gun, shoot a few staples into your driftwood (lightly, so they don't go in all the way), then slide the rhizomes under and gently tap down the staple being careful not to crush the rhizome. Before too long they will rust over (NO it doesn't harm your water - I've have 50+ staples in my tank with no ill effect). The rust makes it so you can't even seem them.

If you ever do a corkboard wall, staples work MAGIC. You can just push them in with your fingers and the moss or ferns will stick. After awhile just tug them out.
Sounds like a "Tight" fit for the rhizome if done incorrectly, and would not the staples dissolve in water? Rusty stuff in my aquarium, I'm not to sure about.

I take it you've done this and had not problems with fish dying or being continually ill from the rusty staples?

GD
 

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I take it you've done this and had not problems with fish dying or being continually ill from the rusty staples?
I wouldn't have suggested it otherwise. :) I'm not sure if there are staples out there that WOULD hurt, but I was using standard staple gun staples and they were just fine. I've also used regular office staples on the cork.

I'm not saying that it 100% doesn't touch your water chemistry, most likely it does in some small way BUT, if it does then I've never seen it adversely effect a tank (meaning I've been lucky and haven't had any mystery problems or algae with stapled tanks, even ones as small as 3 gallons). I haven't used staples in invert tanks though, not sure if they'd be sensitive to any extra metals that might be there.

And yes, you can crush the rhizome if you're not careful or if you try to staple directly over the rhizome. I normally do a few testers to see just how far the gun punches the staple in and if it is close I just slip the rhizome under. Thread the roots and then tug it through, or thread a leaf through so you have a couple leaves on either side of the staple (works well for baby plants).
 

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You could use a phillips head screwdriver to make the space for the staple. Then pull it out, then insert the rhizome. No crushing.
This has me confused? Lets see if I get this idea. Stick the Wood with the screwdriver deep enough to insert the plants rhizome to hold it there but leave out the staple right? That sounds like the best method of all!:icon_wink

How about for longer rhizomes maybe use a 1"-2" wide scraper/putty knife or the like?

GD
 

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I think he means to shoot the staple as if you are trying to staple the screwdriver to the wood. Then pull the driver out which will leave a gap between the staple and wood to thread the plant roots thru.
Gene
 

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Super glue leaves ugly white patches, which of course get covered as the plants grow. Works great otherwise.

The staple method does sound like a good one, maybe I'll try it one day if I'm out of glue:hihi:
Don't have staple gun, but have super glue. I'll stick. Stucked.:angel:
 

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Hmm, i find rubber bands and or thread work great, and there are NO questionable outcomes.
i believ staples may have enough copper or trace metals to kill shrimp, maybe not though.
 
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