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I'm planning on covering a large piece of malaysian driftwood with pearl moss and placing it diagonally in my tank, (like one end in the substrate a few inches from the wall, and the other end up against the top corner of the tank), with hopes that the pearl moss will attach and droop down. I think this would look very pretty. Has anyone tried this before? Anyone have better suggestions? I got a bunch of pearl moss, and have never used it before, and am very excited to do so! Also, will the moss eventually cover the parts of the DW that don't get light? What if the tank gets some sunlight? I feel like it would look better hanging off a piece of DW than just putting it on a rock right? I'm not exactly sure what this stuff looks like after it grows out for awhile, or how well/quickly it attaches. I was thinking of actually super-gluing the moss at first to keep it on the wood until it naturally spreads and attaches. Or would you suggest fishing wire? Maybe I'm just bad at it, but I find attaching moss with wire sooo hard and difficult for some reason, and it seems a lot of people do use superglue, perhaps for that reason. I also dislike seeing the wire, but I know it gets overgrown so whatever.

Also, I've got some flame, weeping, and xmas moss that I can work with. I've been thinking about making a moss wall, but I'm not sure I want to make one. I probably will though, I just don't have the supplies right now. I suppose I could make a carpet. But hypothetically, if I do make a moss wall, which of the three varieties would you choose and why? Also, if you could use any moss, excluding java moss, which would you use and why?

Has anybody used a large piece of driftwood, and attached different varieties of moss at different levels. Like layering the different mosses. Does it look good? And will they end up growing over each other? I would assume that they would end up growing over each other eventually, but then again, perhaps not. Perhaps they will mix at the borders, and then not keep expanding, since there is already another type of moss taking up that space. Does this make sense? I feel like I'm describing this poorly.

Also, I saw a thread someone created about an awesome dry start method (don't have a link, but I'm sure many of you know what I'm talking about or have seen the thread about it) where they actually ground up their fissidens, (not sure what type of grinder they used, I couldn't tell from the picture, anyone know?), and then they spread the resulting ground fissidens on to their hardscape and the reamainder on the soil and it worked like a charm! I was wondering if the same method, specifically grinding it up, would work for flame/xmas/weeping moss, or is it just something you can do with fissidens for some reason?

I would think it probably works with all mosses, but I'm no botanist, and I don't really know the difference between fissidens and other moss species besides how they look. I just know they're not liverworts like pellia or subwassertang. So I'm wondering if anybody knows or has experience with this method, especially with different types of moss, and if you have any tips on how to do this. I know that bonsai enthusiasts and such do something like this with a mix of yeast or beer or something. Same method also used in terrariums.

Sorry for so many questions, any input much appreciated, thanks!!!

:smile::smile::smile:
 

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I don't have any answers to these questions, but I'm very curious as to the answers too. I haven't had much luck with moss in the past, so any answers anyone gives will be great.
 

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I think its a personal preference. You can use any moss you want for a specific set up. Most moss variety like to get shaded. Others love light.
 

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.

Also, I saw a thread someone created about an awesome dry start method (don't have a link, but I'm sure many of you know what I'm talking about or have seen the thread about it) where they actually ground up their fissidens, (not sure what type of grinder they used, I couldn't tell from the picture, anyone know?), and then they spread the resulting ground fissidens on to their hardscape and the reamainder on the soil and it worked like a charm! !

:smile::smile::smile:
First post here... hee hee :)

I've used this method in landscaping VERY successfully. I have not used it in an aquatic environment, but see no reason particular varieties wouldn't take well to the process. Great idea-- wish now my tank wasn't full.
 

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No need to grind up the fissidens. Just lay the fronds on the wood for the dry start and it should attach after a few weeks. If it you leave dry for longer, it will convert to its emergent form.
 

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And BTW, I personally like moss-- also your idea of mixing and letting it do it's thing. I've always liked the look of natural process on driftwood too. I've got some really cool unidentified stuff growing on mine right now, with moss placed-- looks totally natural and appealing IMO. Check my album if interested.
 

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I have a driftwood with 7-8 species of moss tied apart. I take care that they do not get mingle by clipping off branches which get closer to other variety of moss.

Take into acc.diff.varieties of moss grow at diff.pace so place n tie them accordingly on yr driftwood. I have placed the quick growing at a distance from the slow growing also avoid keeping similar looking moss near each other.

I have a 18 gallon tank with CO2, 0.8 w/l for 7 hrs and ferts added so the moss grow well, but in lowtech tanks the mosses grow at a slower pace
 
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