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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do offspring of TW-fire reds, both shrimplets & larger juvie sizes, show their intense red coloration early after birth or right at birth?

At what age do the "red legs" show,do they show fairly quick or at birth?

Unlike standard red cherries that have a red female & a male that has colors ranging from almost transparent to having some red, how are the TW males usually colored (bright red,blotchy red, transparent red, etc).


And.....if in doubt about the coloration of the TW male, would the "red legs" be a definitive marking regardless of the amount of body coloration?


Thanks,

Marty



PS: I recently purchased a number of TW fire reds and several of them are about 1/4" and up (no adults). At first they didn't show much color obviously due to travel and now the red is coming out. Since I plan on raising them I wanted to find out more about them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That link sort of answers one of the questions, although it is a very good link about "grading" cherry shrimp.


I had read somewhere a few months ago that the difference between Sakura and Fire-reds was that the Sakura had nice red except for the legs while the Fire-reds had a "brighter" red but the legs were hit & miss for color.

The difference between the Taiwan Fire-reds (and Painted version) was a more intense red + the legs while the Painted fire-reds had a darker red and the body looked like it had been "painted" + the legs were red.

I had read this about 4-5 months ago but I never bookmarked it.


Unlike the "Crystal Red" shrimp that does have a grading scale I would like to see a similar scale for cherry shrimp. The link has the right idea using pictures & text, but I doubt many people would pay attention to it.
 

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Sakura are a tossup. A percentage of them will have full red legs.
Others wont.

Your best bet is to have the best looking ones mate together.
Everything else should be culled.

Take the best of the best out of your first group of babies.
Mate them together.

That becomes your breeding colony.

You'll get a higher percentage of good breeders then.

-Gordon
 
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