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I am having difficulty understanding how a bulkhead fastener is supposed to fastern to the pipe that it is intended to connect to.

As I understand it, there are threaded male sides, and slip female sides. How does the pipe attach to the slip female sides? The threaded male sides are not a problem for me to understand, but it is the female sides that I do not understand the intent of their plumbing procedure.

Do I use silicone to connect them? Are the female sides threaded on the inside as well? Why don't they just make double barbed bulkhead fasteners? Do they make double threaded (inside and out) bulkhead fasteners and then additional fittings to fasten to these that are both barbed?

There is a maelstrom of information out there about how to fasten the bulkheads themselves, but I keep drawing up irrelevant information on fastening tubes TO the bulkheads.

Your patience and information is kindly appreciated. Thank you.
 

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Basically there are four possible connection types: Male threaded, female threaded, male slip, and female slip.

Note that female threads are internal, male threads are external. Most bulkheads are female/female.

Slip connections are glued. The glue used depends on plastic type. Pipe to fittings is generally PVC to PVC which uses standard plumbing cement. Some bulkheads are ABS which must be glued with "transition cement" because you are mixing plastics.

I recently built a setup using a mix of threaded and slip joints. I would recommend avoiding threaded connections whenever possible and use unions where you want to be able to disconnect in the future. When you are tightening a threaded connection there is a very fine line between leaking and cracked.


My best advice: if you choose to use threaded connections spend 2$ buying a few pieces and crack them intentionally so you know the margin of error. If you've never cracked a piece you will always be guessing at how tight you can go. Once you've got the feel threaded connections are pretty easy.

Why don't they just make double barbed bulkhead fasteners? Do they make double threaded (inside and out) bulkhead fasteners and then additional fittings to fasten to these that are both barbed?
You will need to build your own barb/barb bulkhead by combining a threaded bulkhead and barbed fittings.

http://www.bulkreefsupply.com/bulkhead-abs-thread-x-thread-1-45713f6ff2041d3fdfae927b82488db8.html

http://www.bulkreefsupply.com/sched...hread-1-d4f31b020955e1892af61ebff0e3e4d0.html

You could also do it slip but for something so simple you might as well go threads.
 

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It's called slip if its not threaded and if its slip....

Yes you glue them up. I use PVC cleaner on both the fitting and the pipe, then purple primer applied to both, lastly PVC glue on both and shove them together.

You only get one shot at it...it will set and you will not be able to turn or move it in seconds. Measure twice, cut once.
 

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I've got about 20 tanks with bulkhead fittings. I use all threaded bulkheads. I redesign/repurpose tanks way too much to glue fittings.
I only use pipe tape and I have yet to crack one. I never recommend dope on fish tanks.
I do have two fittings that were slip but I glued a length of sprinkler pipe into them and converted it to a male threaded. Regular pvc cement works fine. I even used it on CPVC to make my bypass valve for my Vortex with no leaks. And I rarely ever use cleaner or primer unless it's for pressure applications. And then usually only if it's getting inspected.
 
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