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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,


A few questions for those experienced with hatching brine shrimp eggs:


1. The PH here in New Orleans is 8.2. This means I don't have to add baking soda, correct?


2. Some websites say you don't need a light right on the top of the hatchery, since room light is enough. Is this correct?


3. Is it worth raising the shrimp to a larger size in a separate container to feed larger fish? As I understand, the main nutritional value of BBS is the sac attached to the babies, which will not last beyond a day. Any information or experience on this?


Thanks in advance.
 

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Salt is more necessary than baking soda. You may not need light but you need warmth, so the warmth from the light is what's needed. During harvest you DEFINITELY need the light so the shrimp goes to it and you can scoop out whatever is necessary.

From my experience, bigger container the better your yield. You can absolutely use a smaller container but depends on how many you want to use (size of the amount of bbs).

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Salt is more necessary than baking soda. You may not need light but you need warmth, so the warmth from the light is what's needed. During harvest you DEFINITELY need the light so the shrimp goes to it and you can scoop out whatever is necessary.

From my experience, bigger container the better your yield. You can absolutely use a smaller container but depends on how many you want to use (size of the amount of bbs).

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

Thanks. The point about using the light to keep the container warm is a good one. I don't think I need a light during harvest. In my experience, as soon as you stop the air pump the BBS will drop to the bottom. I just harvest them with a pipette. My third question is about raising the BBS to adulthood in a separate container. It was not about the container used to hatch the eggs.
 

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I use Instant Ocean marine aquarium salt and have never added baking soda. They hatch. Never attempted to raise them to adulthood in 30 years of hatching them! I purchased adult BS from local fish stores when those were a thing many times, but the steps to raise them were never something I wanted (or had much need) to attempt.
 

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I am able to hatch BBS super easy, but have never been able to get them survive beyond about 3 or 4 days, never mind to adulthood! Tried all suggestions of feeding them and moving to bigger container etc, but no luck.

Best to feed them to fish as soon as they hatch for maximum nutrition, otherwise they just use up their egg-sacks over the first few days and hence become less nutritious. If you can get them to mature into adults then you're a better aquarist than I! but as others have said, there's not really much point and it may not be worth the hassle.

I bought a "Hobby artemia hatchery" to try as an easy way to hatch smaller quantities of BBS. Works pretty well, much less hassle than messing around with air pumps in cola bottles etc, and super simple to hatch a smaller number of BBS at a time. They seem to hatch a bit slower than in an aerated bottle setup and also come out over the course of a few days, which is more convenient. Looks like this:

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I use Instant Ocean marine aquarium salt and have never added baking soda. They hatch. Never attempted to raise them to adulthood in 30 years of hatching them! I purchased adult BS from local fish stores when those were a thing many times, but the steps to raise them were never something I wanted (or had much need) to attempt.

Thank you!


It's not worth it to raise them to adulthood since bbs is so cheap to purchase

I agree, thanks.


I am able to hatch BBS super easy, but have never been able to get them survive beyond about 3 or 4 days, never mind to adulthood! Tried all suggestions of feeding them and moving to bigger container etc, but no luck.

Best to feed them to fish as soon as they hatch for maximum nutrition, otherwise they just use up their egg-sacks over the first few days and hence become less nutritious. If you can get them to mature into adults then you're a better aquarist than I! but as others have said, there's not really much point and it may not be worth the hassle.

I bought a "Hobby artemia hatchery" to try as an easy way to hatch smaller quantities of BBS. Works pretty well, much less hassle than messing around with air pumps in cola bottles etc, and super simple to hatch a smaller number of BBS at a time. They seem to hatch a bit slower than in an aerated bottle setup and also come out over the course of a few days, which is more convenient. Looks like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSBRE7TeB0U

This product looks fantastic! It is a pity that I purchased all the setup of traditional hatchery already :( I will try it one day, thanks.
 

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1) Not necessarily. I think my water's pretty soft in Arkansas and can get away without baking soda. Using a marine salt like Instant Ocean will buffer the water.

2)Room light is fine. My hatcheries are under a skylight, and I get pretty good hatches.

3)I had a thread on this topic a very long while ago (like 4-5 years ago)...I should restart that thread. While the main nutritional value of BBS is in the yolk sack upon hatching, there is value in adults, which have a more even balance of protein and lipids. You have to gut load the adults prior to feeding them, but if you're raising them to adulthood, that jsut means giving them one last feeding prior to raising them.
 

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I am able to hatch BBS super easy, but have never been able to get them survive beyond about 3 or 4 days, never mind to adulthood! Tried all suggestions of feeding them and moving to bigger container etc, but no luck.

Best to feed them to fish as soon as they hatch for maximum nutrition, otherwise they just use up their egg-sacks over the first few days and hence become less nutritious. If you can get them to mature into adults then you're a better aquarist than I! but as others have said, there's not really much point and it may not be worth the hassle.

I bought a "Hobby artemia hatchery" to try as an easy way to hatch smaller quantities of BBS. Works pretty well, much less hassle than messing around with air pumps in cola bottles etc, and super simple to hatch a smaller number of BBS at a time. They seem to hatch a bit slower than in an aerated bottle setup and also come out over the course of a few days, which is more convenient. Looks like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSBRE7TeB0U
Thats what I use as well. Works great!
 

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I love that hatchery! I was annoyed at spending the money on such a simple hunk of plastic, but I had previously tried to hatch BBS with materials I already had (which does not include an air pump) and it did not go well, so I clearly needed to rethink my approach. It works perfectly and every step of the process is easy, so I take back every negative thought I had about it. 10/10 perfect for my needs. If I need a continuous BBS supply in the future I'll get another.

I mix 4 cup of water at ~82F with a pinch of baking soda, a drop of water conditioner, and 15 grams sea salt from my kitchen. I don't know if I need the baking soda or water conditioner, but it's no trouble to add them. I use a kitchen scale to measure the salt and I have no idea how accurate it is, but clearly it's good enough. I set it up according to the directions, but I only have LED light bulbs, so I use that and leave it in the hottest room in my house.
 

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For Hatching:
1 to 1.5 teaspoons of Pickling Salt(non-iodized) per cup of dechlorinated water
Pinch of Baking Soda
Temperature: 82 deg. F (24-36 hrs)
Light is not required during hatching
Air stone required

Raise to adults:
I followed the youtube. Leave bucket outside
covered(translucent). No airstone. I did use instan ocean since you need the minerals in the salt mix to raise them. You dump unhatched eggs into a bucket. I have limited space in my balcony so only did 2 gallon bucket. I also get direct blazing So. CA heat. Amazing, the shrimp survived 103 deg. F weather. I still see many mated pairs in the bucket. I feed spiruline powder. Sometimes I forget to feed them.

It is mainly experimental. It is a mess to scoop them out since you will end up with unhatched eggs.

From what I read, adult brine have little nutritional value unless they have been fed with vitamins prior to harvest for feeding fish.

My first 2 trials, everything died. Probably just way too many brine shrimp intially. I had no luck doing it indoors, works for others. I think the UV light has some benefits to stagnant water.

Hope this helps. 🙂
 

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I am able to hatch BBS super easy, but have never been able to get them survive beyond about 3 or 4 days, never mind to adulthood! Tried all suggestions of feeding them and moving to bigger container etc, but no luck.

Best to feed them to fish as soon as they hatch for maximum nutrition, otherwise they just use up their egg-sacks over the first few days and hence become less nutritious. If you can get them to mature into adults then you're a better aquarist than I! but as others have said, there's not really much point and it may not be worth the hassle.

I bought a "Hobby artemia hatchery" to try as an easy way to hatch smaller quantities of BBS. Works pretty well, much less hassle than messing around with air pumps in cola bottles etc, and super simple to hatch a smaller number of BBS at a time. They seem to hatch a bit slower than in an aerated bottle setup and also come out over the course of a few days, which is more convenient. Looks like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSBRE7TeB0U
Thanks for showing this, just bought one! BBS are such a messy PIA to hatch with the airstones and all that. This looks very promising as a simple solution. Based on reviews, it's the best one on Amazon.

I have tried to grow them out too and it is not easy at all, seems like more of an art and not worth it unless you have need for loads of brine shrimp and can't get them locally. The problem is titrating the proper amount of food for them. Slightly too little and they quickly die of starvation, slightly too much and they quickly die of poor water quality. It's very unforgiving. I've kept store bought ones alive for a few days in a small tank, but even with water changes and maintenance still could not keep them going. Was hoping they would breed and I could get a perpetual supply but turned out to be FAR more trouble than it is worth.
 

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I have one of them, too. Never liked the old fashion methods. It makes two to three days worth of feedings and I re-set it up on the third afternoon. New batch ready the next day. I bred harlequins this year due to this hatchery. Now I have 50+ juveniles all raised with the help of this hatchery. About to bred some nannacaras using it, too. It works well. I put a small reading lamp over it with a construction paper shield wrapped around the lamp shroud and sitting flush to the hatchery surface. It's bright and they stay warm. I highly recommend. I feed frozen shrimp if treating the adults.
 

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Those Hobby hatcheries really are great. So simple and so much less hassle than the normal hatchery with airline setup. To feed, you just lift out the little cup and rinse the BBS under the tap (it has the right gauze built in so you don't lose any). I then just use a syringe of tank water to wash the BBS out of the cup and into a test tube from where I share them between the tanks. The other great thing for me is that you don't end up with a million BBS all at once on day one, but a slower hatch over the course of 3 days or so (I'd say 40% hatch on days 1 and 2, 20% on day 3, and maybe a few on day 4 if you leave it that long). Takes only a few min to reset every 3 or 4 days, just needs a quick rinse, new salt water and a small scoop of eggs. The hatch rate and quantity is perfect for feeding a few tanks. I get first hatch after about 18 hours, but my room temp is about 29C!

My tip: If you have a largish syringe (50ml good), put the dry BS eggs into that first (pull plunger right out and pour in from top), insert plunger, withdraw it to suck up some water from the hatchery, quick shake to ensure eggs are wet and mixed up, then squirt around perimeter ring of hatchery. I found this better than simply sprinkling into the hatchery where some eggs just sat on the surface and didn't get properly wet, or else stuck all round the side as I tried to stir them in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I just wanted to report that I just got this product, recommended by en7jos:

https://www.brineshrimpdirect.com/hatchery-dish

Works like a charm! No aeration needed, no hassle. The harvest of the brine shrimp could not be easier. Very impressed. It does not produce large quantities, so it might not work for breeders. Otherwise, very convenient product.
 

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I just wanted to report that I just got this product, recommended by en7jos:

https://www.brineshrimpdirect.com/hatchery-dish

Works like a charm! No aeration needed, no hassle. The harvest of the brine shrimp could not be easier. Very impressed. It does not produce large quantities, so it might not work for breeders. Otherwise, very convenient product.
Mine is supposed to come today, just have to figure out a place to put it.

I've thought using some of the napoli from this to start a micro grow out/culture "tank" in a small gladware (between 8-24 oz size) to grow a few to adult. I'd sit it on top of the aquarium under the canopy so it stays warm and gets light. Water quality is hard to control in something that small but something that small lets you replace water frequently, daily if you wanted. There are non aerated examples of artermia grow out tanks including all those "sea monkey" kits, so an air line is not needed especially with low culture density. I only have one aquarium and only my female endlers are big enough to eat an adult brine shrimp, so I don't need many. Having 20 swimming in a small container at any given time would be plenty. Seems an interesting experiment anyway.
 

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I've thought using some of the napoli from this to start a micro grow out/culture "tank" in a small gladware (between 8-24 oz size) to grow a few to adult. I'd sit it on top of the aquarium under the canopy so it stays warm and gets light. Water quality is hard to control in something that small but something that small lets you replace water frequently, daily if you wanted. There are non aerated examples of artermia grow out tanks including all those "sea monkey" kits, so an air line is not needed especially with low culture density. I only have one aquarium and only my female endlers are big enough to eat an adult brine shrimp, so I don't need many. Having 20 swimming in a small container at any given time would be plenty. Seems an interesting experiment anyway.
Please do report back on how you get on with this! As I mentioned earlier in the thread, I can hatch BBS easily (29C room temp helps!) but can't keep them past a couple of days. If you have success, please give me an exact recipe for exactly what to do and how to do it!

I have no real need for adult BS (but I'm sure my hyperactive zebra danios would love the hunt!) - but it bugs me not being able to raise them when others seem to do it so easily!

:nerd:
 

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Please do report back on how you get on with this! As I mentioned earlier in the thread, I can hatch BBS easily (29C room temp helps!) but can't keep them past a couple of days. If you have success, please give me an exact recipe for exactly what to do and how to do it!

I have no real need for adult BS (but I'm sure my hyperactive zebra danios would love the hunt!) - but it bugs me not being able to raise them when others seem to do it so easily!

:nerd:
I'll start a thread with the technique if I get it working. This
is one of the resources I am using. It's all Chinese but they show aeration free culturing. One interesting thing is that they recommend 90ppt saltwater (nearly 3x what most brine shrimp recipes call for) to prevent bacteria/algae/microbes from being able to spoil the water.

As an alternative, this
shows a very interesting concept of immersing brine shrimp in a live spirulina culture of "green water" which both feeds the Artemia and consumes and fixes their ammonia waste product. I like the balanced symbiosis.

I think it would be an interesting product to develop, an "Artermia micro grow out/breeder system" that comes with a small "tank" the size of a 10-20oz gladware container and a bottle of concentrated live spirulina in brine. You simply replace the 4-10oz of water in the container with the spirulina brine solution every so many days which effectively does both a water change and replenishes food. If near a light source, the spirulina should multiply and you may not even have to change water. It also leaves the brine shrimp in a permanent Spirulina gutloaded state which is really good for the fishies.

Received my shrimp hatchery yesterday and it could not be easier, what a brilliant system. 18hrs later fed first batch of BBS to my fish. It's so easy with that kit, you just take the little strainer cup out, dip in a small cup of water to rinse (optional) and then dip into your aquarium.
 

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I had a 10G going for awhile for brine shrimp grow-out. It was mostly just an experiment to see what happened and to give my parrots some bigger brine shrimps. I know the nutritional value isn't great, but they sure go crazy eating them.

I heated it probably 78-80deg. Started off with an air stone only, and after a few days turned on a sponge filter with fine sponge (guessing 40ppi) and very gentle flow. Would feed them with a little spirulina powder every other day or so. I treated it like a regular tank, doing 20% water change about once a week. Would gather them at one end with a light and siphon from the other to keep from sucking them out.

I used a relatively low amount of eggs compared to hatching BBS to feed immediately. This probably helped with keeping their waste levels down and keeping them alive. I'd go in with a small net that would only capture the juvenile to adult shrimps. I'm sure I only had a fraction make it to adulthood, but it was still plenty to give the parrots a fun treat.

I'm actually about to start it up again. I'm switching the parrot tank over to a Mattenfilter. I'll have room now under the stand to put a grow-out tank and can tap into the air pump running the Mattenfilter.
 
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