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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have any of you fellow woodworkers had problems with Titebond II glue giving off lots of fumes that just won't go away? I used to use original Titebond, and never had a problem. And, before that I used Elmer's Carpenter's Glue, essentially the same stuff, with no problem. But, the Titebond II glue I'm now using has the whole house smelling with the fumes, long after my last glue job has dried.

The MSDS for Titebond II suggests that this may be a known property of that version, while it isn't for original Titebond. It isn't easy to get this from the report, with all of the boilerplate CYA stuff in it, but the former does say the fumes can be harmful, and the latter doesn't say that.

In any case I'm tossing the half bottle I have left and buying only Elmer's Carpenter's Glue from now on.
 

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Titebond I dont like using... because of the same reason with the fumes...

just for an idea normal white glue will support 650PSI of force..... carpenters glue is around 1000PSI, liquid nails is like 1500PSI..... from what i was told from my wood working teacher in high school.....
 

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Hmm...I'm a contractor/finish carpenter for many years and have never noticed strong smell/odor myself.
I usually prefer the tightbond III as it is water resistant, but sometimes not available and use II w/ no problems.
Tightbond is the preference among the high end cabinet shops I've worked for as well as myself.
I'll be building my new frame for my new 150g tomorrow, I'll be extra observant to this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
But, liquid nails isn't good at all for cabinet work, only carpentry work. Titebond, and similar glues, is stronger than the wood itself, in my experience. I can't break a joint made with it - the wood always fails first. So, any extra strength is of no value to me.

I should say that I don't find the aroma from Titebond II to be a bad smell, but my wife hates it with a fury. My house continues to smell from it, and I will be off to HD soon to find something my neighbor told me can be put in the heating system return air duct to adsorb the odors. For me, all of the smells associated with woodworking just bring back good memories of hours spent in my shop. Giving up those memories vs a continual ticked off wife is an easy decision:biggrin:
 

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I used about a gallon of TBII in my recent plywood tank, and did not notice any smells. Of course, most of it was assembled in the garage, and there are few things that produce poisonous fumes as bad as Epoxy paint.

Still not quite sure if I prefer TB or Gorilla... both work pretty well. I chose the TBII for its cheapness.

Is your woodworking shop/area inside the house?
 

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It's funny, I always tell people glue is actually stronger than nails, and you will never break the joint before splitting lumber.
Most people just don't believe this unless they are woodworkers, and if you ever made a mistake and had to pull your stuff apart after glued and dried, you'd surely be convinced!lol
Now the liquid nails, yeah that's FTW...in odor and mess!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My "workshop" is a small area in our attached garage, and, of course the building code doesn't allow any air to move from a garage to the living area of the house. I think this happened because I used about 1/4 of a bottle laminating birch boards together, then found that the garage was too cold for the glue to set right, so I brought it into the house to dry. From then on we had the smell.

But, the good news is that Home Depot has a product as useful as Duct Tape! It is called "The Gonzo Odor Eliminator", and it is a mesh bag of 2 pounds of rocks, which look like volcanic pumice based rocks. You are supposed to put one of these in the area that stinks and a few hours later the smell is gone. Ha Ha! Well, I bought two of them, on my neighbor's recommendation, and put one in front of each of the two air return grills. That was about 2 hours ago. And, now the smell is totally gone!

I'm thinking of putting one bag in each air duct behind the filter, and leaving them for permanent protection. The directions say this lasts 8 months, and then you put them out in the sun for a day, and they are as good as new. (Oddly enough I think my balding spot on my head is growing hair now too!)

No more Titebond II for me, in any case. I'm back with Elmer's yellow glue to stay.
 

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Unless whatever you are gluing will be exposed to water on a regular basis why not just use Titebond I (original Titebond). The biggest difference between the two is that Titebond II is more water resistant. Even in an aquarium stand I wouldnt hesitate to use Titebond I.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Unless whatever you are gluing will be exposed to water on a regular basis why not just use Titebond I (original Titebond). The biggest difference between the two is that Titebond II is more water resistant. Even in an aquarium stand I wouldnt hesitate to use Titebond I.
I agree, but I also went back to Elmers Carpenter's Glue, which I used for many years with no problems at all.

I finally put both of those bags of rocks in the ducts behind the air filters. From reading on the Gonzo website it appears that the rocks are just zeolite, so the very high CEC is what captures and holds the aroma molecules. Still no smell, so they definitely do work pretty well. And, I'm back to being my wife's favorite person:biggrin:
 

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I rarely use TB II, but this surprises me. TB II is a water-based PVA glue; I've never noticed a smell using them.

BTW, my preference is TB III. The main reason is it's ability to cure at relatively low temperatures (down to ~45 or so); it gets cold in the shop this time of year. I've also gotten used to its consistancy. The downside is its very short working time, a problem TB I and TB II also have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That 45F capability is worth a lot. Tibebond II seems to not cure at all below 55F or so, at least not for me.

The MSDS clearly indicates that TBII has more smell than TBI, but only by reading between the lines of CYA statements. It is anything but an overpowering smell - very slight in fact, but in a closed house, after a few hours it is annoying to me, and unbearable to my wife. Fortunately, the Gonzo rocks have eliminated the smell.
 

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... And, I'm back to being my wife's favorite person:biggrin:
Thats the most important thing and one that I find very difficult as a DIYer. Yes, honey, the boards/saw/clamps/drill/electrical meter has to be on the kitchen table/staircase/living room floor and yes, I will actually get this done before Christmas/your parents arrive/we die.
 
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