The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I pulled these two plants out of the lake by where I live. The small shamrock-like-leaf plant has a very long root, maybe FrogBit ?

The stalkie looking one has a big wide root system, maybe some type of Sword ?
 

Attachments

·
Fresh Fish Freak
Joined
·
24,403 Posts
Pretty sure the first one is Hemianthus micranthemoides.

Second one I have no clue, but Echinodorus species are not native to North America and I'm sure that's not one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
THANKS!

Hopefully my turtle will like eating them once they are established in my growing tank

Todd
 

·
Fresh Fish Freak
Joined
·
24,403 Posts
Oh I bet!

If you're growing HM for turtle munchies, it would probably grow most quickly in an emersed setup.

I'd try and get a solid ID on that other plant before trying it as food though- there are a lot of toxic plants out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yep Laura, getting a solid ID before adding him to the aquatic plant tank is a must!

what do you mean by "emersed setup" does it mean the plants are totally covered?

I also have a water fern and an Anubias in the tank, and I'm planning on getting an Anacharis (if I can find someone who sells it). So can all those plants mentioned live in an emersed setup?

Thanks so much for your help!

I'm building the substrate as we post :)
 

·
Fresh Fish Freak
Joined
·
24,403 Posts
Nope- emersed means just the roots are wet, the rest of the plant is growing up in the open air. "Emersed" versus "submersed"

EDIT- this might be an interesting read for you: http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=592602&highlight=dry+start+method

PPS - I've heard rumors that Anubias is toxic to some animals (can't say for sure if that's true or not), so be careful before using that one to feed your turtle, too
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Can anyone help me with the big broad leafed plant?

The most I can say to help is that it has a bunch of little roots all balled together in a big clump. And it was taken from the side of the lake in a water run-off area that has very wet/marshy bermuda grass.

Maybe it's not even a aquatic plant?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,518 Posts
Pretty sure the first one is Hemianthus micranthemoides.

Second one I have no clue, but Echinodorus species are not native to North America and I'm sure that's not one.
I actually think the first one looks like Micranthemum umbrosum.

And there is some Echindorus sp. found in North America and are native. Echinodorus cordifolius or Creeping burhead is found in southeastern states along with Alabama although I'm not sure if that's what that is or not.

http://www.outdooralabama.com/fishing/freshwater/where/ponds/p/ap/guide/emergent/

http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/138
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
after comparing on line, I'm convinced that the first one is Hemianthus Callitrichoides as for the second, I suppose he would be easy enough to put in the tank, if the tank wasn't already filled with otheres, as is, and not knowing who he is (so I don't know if I can feed him to my turtle), I guess I'll give him a toss :(

thanks anyways guys

Todd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
yep lochaber, that's it, wonder why it was growing in marshy bermuda grass on the side of the lake/swamp.

Well thanks anyways! I decided not to include him in my aquarium. I already have three aquatic baby tears, one anubias, one aquatic fern, and three anacharis. that's more than enough I think.

thanks again guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,518 Posts
after comparing on line, I'm convinced that the first one is Hemianthus Callitrichoides as for the second, I suppose he would be easy enough to put in the tank, if the tank wasn't already filled with otheres, as is, and not knowing who he is (so I don't know if I can feed him to my turtle), I guess I'll give him a toss :(

thanks anyways guys

Todd
I'm pretty sure you don't have Hemianthus Callitrichoides. As far as I know it's not found in the wild in Alabama like Micranthemum umbrosum is. Look at the link I provided. Micranthemum umbrosum is also called baby tears and to me it looks like the plant you have pictured.

http://www.outdooralabama.com/fishing/freshwater/where/ponds/p/ap/guide/emergent/micranthemumu.cfm
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top