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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an Anubias nana and I am wanting to split it up and put part of it in my Betta tank. Am I able to cut the green part at the bottom in half where all the stems are growing off of? (Is that the rhizome?) Or is it done differently?

Sorry for a lack of proper wordage here.

Thanks guys.
 

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Awesome. I love how easy propagating can be sometimes. My betta will appreciate it I'm sure.
Plants are fun that way, aren't they?! Kind of like "cut and paste" haha.

And the horizontal stem growing above the soil line is actually called a stolon. I don't know why, but it seems like everyone in the aquarium plant hobby uses the term rhizome incorrectly. A rhizome is very similar to a stolon, the only real difference being a rhizome grows beneath the soil surface.
 

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Propagating Nana's

Hello All - Just wanting to say "Thanks", after reading the feedback's to Studman0143 question. I too had the same question about Nana's and propagating them, as I couldn't find much about doing it - not even from my local landscape company ( Go Figure ). I just finished my little project & followed what you all had said to do, and it couldn't of been anymore easier to do if I say so myself. I'll send in photo's later after the water has cleared, and the fish have settled down for a day or two. Thanks Again for the info!!!!
 

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Plants are fun that way, aren't they?! Kind of like "cut and paste" haha.

And the horizontal stem growing above the soil line is actually called a stolon. I don't know why, but it seems like everyone in the aquarium plant hobby uses the term rhizome incorrectly. A rhizome is very similar to a stolon, the only real difference being a rhizome grows beneath the soil surface.
My understanding is that both rhizomes and stolons can be above or below ground. Rhizomes are generally, but not exclusively underground. The difference as I have been taught is that a stolon is basically a runner between two plants whereas a rhizome is a horizontal stem (generally bearing roots and leaves). Stolons have longer node spacing, like the connectors between lilaeopsis nodes whereas rhizomes usually have short node spacing (java fern, anubias, etc).
 
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