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Discussion Starter #1
I just got my CO2 tank filled, and I'm lost at what to do. I watched a youtube video for how to set it up but when I open the valve for the tank itself, it seems to be releasing from here:



Here seems to be a small hole of something? I don't know what I'm doing. :icon_frow


If someone could just explain how to set it up in a way to where it's easy to understand I would really appreciate it. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well basically what I did was open the main valve and then it's started coming out from that opening; everything else is shut at the moment. (valve on the far right and the big black one)
Is there something I should be adjusting?
 

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The Pressure Relief Valve(PRV) is the tiny hole on the side of your regulator most likely where the excess co2 is ventilating from..

Did you just get this filled recently?
 

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Remove the regulator. Wait until tomorrow to put your regulator on, then tell me if it still leaks :) I bet it was ice cold when you probably installed your regulator?

You want to wait for the cylinder to reach ambient room temp before you install your regulator. Its possible it may be slightly over filled, or your PRV is malfunctioning.
 

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Here's something else that may be going on.

It sounds to me that the working pressure knob had the regulator turned on when you opened the CO2 cylinder with the solenoid was turned off.

You should turn the big black knob counterclockwise to loosen it all the way before you turn your CO2 on. If you don't do this you take a risk of damaging your regulator.

Turning the black knob clockwise opens the regulator up to release the CO2.

In other words, the black knob works opposite of the way that you close and open the CO2 cylinder.(Left-Close, Right-Open)

PS: I blew two low pressure gauges on my Cornelius regulator before I found out about practically unscrewing the knob before I open the cylinder. I unscrew the knob before I swap the cylinder out. Then I adjust the working pressure after I turn the CO2 cylinder on. Regulators that have a fixed working pressure (Azoo, JBJ, Aqua Medic, etc.) don't require this step.


From: http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/p...lwaukee-ma-957-co2-regulator-instuctions.html
Momotaro said:
Milwaukee MA 957 CO2 Regulator Instructions

We often read that folks need help hooking up their Milwaukee regulators. Here are some instructions.


Operating Instructions for the Milwaukee MA957


BEFORE YOU START! :

Secure cylinders so that they will not tip or fall.

Inspect the cylinder valves for damaged threads, dirt, oil, or grease. Remove dust and dirt with a clean cloth.

Crack open the cylinder valve for an instant to blow out any foreign matter in the throat of the cylinder.



ATTACHING THE REGULATOR:

Attach the regulator to the cylinder valve placing the supplied plastic o-ring (not shown) between the regulator and the tank. Tighten with a wrench. Omission of this o-ring will cause loss of gas!

Unscrew the large brass ring (G) from the Bubble Counter (H) and fill the bubble counter 1/2 full of fresh water. Be sure the needle valve (B) is closed before filling with water. Once filled, replace the brass o-ring (G).

Before opening the cylinder valve turn the regulator adjustment knob (E) counter clockwise until tension is no longer felt on the knob. Do not fully remove the regulator flow adjustment knob. IF THE CYLINDER VALVE IS OPENED WITH THE REGULATOR KNOB CLOSED, DAMAGE TO THE REGULATOR CAN RESULT!

VERY SLOWLY and CAREFULLY openthe cylinder valve COMPLETELY to seal the cylinder valve packing. The amount of gas in the cylinder can now be read on the High Pressure Gauge (D).

Plug the solenoid (C) into a suitable, grounded, AC Wall outlet, Hanna pH Mini Controller, or Milwaukee SMS122 pH Controller. The solenoid uses slightly more then 6 watts and it is normal for it to feel warm during operation.

Open the needle valve (B) by turning counter-clockwise.

Turn the adjustment knob (E) clockwise until you get a reading on the Low Pressure Gauge (F) of approximately 10lbs on the outside set of numbers (use the numbers on the top row). You should now see bubbles in the counter.

Unplug the Solenoid (C) from the wall or controller and unscrew the compression fitting and pass the air hose through the fitting and attach the tubing to the nipple (A). Be sure your tubing fits tightly on the nipple and that it is pressed all the way down. Slide the compression fitting onto the nipple and tighten.

Plug the Solenoid (C) back into the wall outlet or pH Controller unit and adjust the bubble count on your reactor using the needle valve (B). Fine tuning the count can be accomplished with either the needle valve (B) and by adjusting the regulator output pressure with adjustment knob (E) as discussed in the pevious step. The more you increase the pressure as indicated on the low pressure gauge (F) the more difficult it will be to fine tune your bubble count using needle valve (B). Therefore it is more desirable to keep the pressure indicated on the low pressure gauge (F) low and adjust your bubble count using the Needle Valve (B).

Hope this helps!

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks everyone. I can't take the regulator off Orlando. ): The guy put it on while I was there and I don't have the tool to remove it. I'm going to try what Left_C suggested and see what happens. The tank is no longer freezing cold. Should I go ahead and do it then?
 

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I am not as much of an expert as the other two but leaving the regulator on overnight and letting the entire assembly warm up will be almost as good as taking it off and then doing the same. Tomorrow try following the instructions that Left_C posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just ran into a another problem and I have a feeling it's pretty bad... :/





The PSI needle is supposed to be on the other side isn't it? I turn on my CO2 like you guys suggested and saw this. Can't read the PSI. Does this mean the entire regulator cannot be used?
 

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Yep. The needle should be on the other side of that screw. Was the black knob on the front unscrewed all the way? If it was not, it is possible that you blew the pressure gauge.

The regulator can still be used, it is just that you won't be able to determine your delivery pressure without that gauge.
 

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Bummer! That's bad news!! You know what happened, don't you? Below is a bit more info.

These are the contacts at Milwaukee: http://www.milwaukeetesters.com/contactus.html

I understand that they are very good to work with. Maybe they will may swap out regulators with you. If they don't, most likely all you have to replace is the low pressure gauge. They are fairly cheap (~ $10) and easy to replace.


The directions that came with it says to: "... Turn your CO2 bottle off. Go to the regulator and turn the main knob counterclockwise till you feel no pressure. Next, go to the needle valve underneath the bubble counter, and turn it counterclockwise ( <- ) all the way out until it stops. ..."

Here are the directions: http://www.milwaukeetesters.com/pdf/MA957 Regulator Set Up Procedure.pdf

The reason why you have to turn the main knob counterclockwise until it is very loose (or for some regulators, it comes completely off), is to close the diaphragm. This is so there is no big burst of CO2 that could damage the components. When you turn the main knob clockwise, you are, in essence, turning a screw that pushes on a spring that, in turn, pushes on the diaphragm and opens it. This allows the CO2 to be released. You will feel some resistance from the spring that is between the screw and diaphragm. The screw itself follows the normal convention for a screw: righty tighty, lefty loosey. It is how the regulators open and close the diaphragms that seems reversed.

Below is a simple diagram showing how this part of a Milwaukee regulator works.

 

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I have that exact regulator, the gauge on the right has no importance. Open the black nobe counter-clock wise until you feel no pressure and turn the needle valve fully open (counter-clock wise) plug the solenoid in, then release your CO2 from your tank. You will get a reading on your left gauge then proceed by turning the black nob close-wise until you see bubbles, then turn the needle valve close-wise to micro manage the bubble count. Trust me I called Milwaukee, the rep told me they are trying to get ride of that right gauge. You may need to fiddle with the nobs for a couple of days to adjust the bubble count because for some reason the first time you adjust your bps an hour later you see no bubbles coming out, if this occurs add more pressure by turning the black nob clock wise until you see bubbles again.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have that exact regulator, the gauge on the right has no importance. Open the black nobe counter-clock wise until you feel no pressure and turn the needle valve fully open (counter-clock wise) plug the solenoid in, then release your CO2 from your tank. You will get a reading on your left gauge then proceed by turning the black nob close-wise until you see bubbles, then turn the needle valve close-wise to micro manage the bubble count. Trust me I called Milwaukee, the rep told me they are trying to get ride of that right gauge. You may need to fiddle with the nobs for a couple of days to adjust the bubble count because for some reason the first time you adjust your bps an hour later you see no bubbles coming out, if this occurs add more pressure by turning the black nob clock wise until you see bubbles again.

Wow wow wow! Thank you so much! I got it working :)
Thanks everyone I'm glad I didn't break it. lol.

So what should my ideal bps be? And I don't have my CO2 on a timer. What should I do at night? I can get a timer tomorrow. Also do I turn it off during water changes?
 

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Your bps really depends on several factors including: a) how effectively you dissolve your CO2; the more effective you are at dissolving the CO2, the less you will need to inject, and vice versa. B) How large your tank is; larger tanks will need a higher bps. C) How heavily planted your tank is. The more plants you have, the more demand there will be for CO2.

As for the timer, you can just set your bps to a low value and leave it on 24/7 until you purchase a timer. Then you can plug the solenoid into the timer, and the timer into the wall so that you can set your CO2 to automatically turn it on/off.

As for turning the CO2 off during water changes, I just leave it running; I don't think you'd save any significant amount of gas by turning it off while doing water changes.
 

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Trust me I called Milwaukee, the rep told me they are trying to get ride of that right gauge.
Are you sure? When I try to do things, I'm generally successful. Either Milwaukee's not trying that hard, or that gauge isn't going anywhere.

In the long term, I think it is important to know where your low pressure is at, approximately.
 

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Wow wow wow! Thank you so much! I got it working :)
Thanks everyone I'm glad I didn't break it. lol. ...
This is great news! I was worried that your gauge was broken.
 

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Are you sure? When I try to do things, I'm generally successful. Either Milwaukee's not trying that hard, or that gauge isn't going anywhere.

In the long term, I think it is important to know where your low pressure is at, approximately.
Positive check out the Milwaukee website under techincal tips > MA957 Regulator Set Up Procedure.
 

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Positive check out the Milwaukee website under techincal tips > MA957 Regulator Set Up Procedure.
Interesting. Maybe not using them correctly has something to do with the complaints about the Milwaukee needle valve? Maybe using them like this has something to do with the end of tank dump some Milwaukee users claim to see?

I use the low pressure gauge to adjust my pressure to 15 psi, and then I adjust the needle valve from there.

Thanks for the info.
 
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