The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
I love sparkling gouramis, they are awesome fish. However a 10 gallon may be a bit crowded for that many fish. Are you planning on using both filters you mentioned? If so the bioload may be ok, but the current in that tank is going to be crazy....
On a positive note, that light and substrate looks good from my knowledge. As far as plants go, will you be injecting co2? If not, look into DIY, its really quite inexpensive and on a 10 gallon could be very effective and stable. How about ferts?

Looking forward to seeing your progress,
Matt

Edit- forgot to add plant suggestions, How about some java moss and Java fern on the driftwood. You could plant some wisteria (H. Difformis) or rotala for some height in the back as well. A carpet without Co2 may prove difficult and very slow, but HC would be a good carpet plant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Sounds great, you could probably get away with 8 tetras and the ottos just fine. Which filters will you be using? If I were you , I'd use the Eheim only to cut down on surface agitation and offgassing. If you go with DIY co2 and ferts, check this link out for dosing information. http://www.theplantedtank.co.uk/EI.htm Use the 40-80 but cut it into half, then half again for a 10 gallon.
I highly recoment bobs tropical plants for dry ferts. I bought a pound of each kno3, k2so4, kh2po4, and csm +b for just over 30 dollars shipped http://www.bobstropicalplants.com/shop/en/ I just dealt with him last week and he was very helpful and informative. His shipping and prices are very reasonable as well :)

Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
Personally I use tap water for my tanks. Many people use RO or RODI water so that they know exactly what is in their water, but I have no experiance with them. However it is my understanding that if you use them, you need to add in all minerals and disolved solids that are taken out during the purification process. This would mean a gh booster and other additives. Maybe somone else can chime in on this

In my post above i was referring to when you clean the polyfil, if you rinsed it under the faucet you would probably kill off bacteria with any chlorine that's in your water. That's the advantage of additional bio media that can just be swished in tank water.

Heres a good read as well:
http://www.ukaps.org/EI.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
this is the CO2 ill be doing

You will need:
1x 2liter Soda Bottle, emptied
1cup Sugar
1tsp Yeast
1tsp Baking Powder
Fresh Warm Water (not from the aquarium)
CO2 Proof Tubing
Small amount of silicone sealant

1) Drink the soda, preferably in one sitting.
2) Drill a hole in the soda cap large enough so the tubing will fit snuggly.
3) Push the tubing through the soda cap so it sticks out maybe 1/2 inch through the bottom of the cap.
4) Seal around the tube on the top and bottom of the soda cap, allow it to dry and make sure that it is air tight!

Once the silicone is dry and it is air tight, it's time to create some CO2!

1) Add the sugar to the bottle (1 cup).
2) Add the yeast and baking powder (1 tsp each) on top of the sugar.
3) Add warm water (1 liter) to the bottle, leave the top 4-5 inches empty as this room is needed to produce the CO2.
4) Cap the bottle and put the other end of the tubing into the intake of your canister filter (in the tank).

The CO2 should start being produced in a day or so, you may notice the occasional bubble being released into the intake of your canister filter. The CO2 will get all mixed up inside the filter and will dissolve into the water. If you were to just place the tube in the tank and let it bubble, the CO2 would leave the tube and float right to the top of the aquarium and would be pointless.

As far as the measurements go, you can figure out what works best for you. The sugar is like food for the CO2 generation so the more sugar you use, the longer the mixture will last. The yeast is what actually reacts and creates the CO2 (along with the water and sugar of course). And the baking powder is used to help stabilize the CO2 production. The amounts stated above should last about 2 weeks.

One 2 liter should be good to supply CO2 to a tank up to about 50 gallons. For larger tanks, just build more CO2 generators!

By the way...

You can also just plug the tubing into an airstone and let it mix with the water that way (but the canister filter method will probably work better).

The CO2 may change the PH of your water.

Once you have started using CO2, don't stop as this will again change the PH of the water. Also, do not close or kink the tube as this will cause excessive pressure to build up in the CO2 canister and it may explode. Although it would look/sound cool, it would suck to have to clean it up.

Also make sure that you have good lighting as it is needed for your plants to grow!

Good luck!

Read more: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/diy-aquarium/diy-co2-generator-611/#ixzz1ZD5Eo3wv
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top