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Is there any particular reason you want to test for potassium? In general, we can dose in excess without worrying too much about toxicity (as other minerals will reach dangerous levels long before potassium).
 

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Is there any particular reason you want to test for potassium? In general, we can dose in excess without worrying too much about toxicity (as other minerals will reach dangerous levels long before potassium).
I second that.

In addition - I dose everything in excess and I still have perfect tanks. Just raise your CO2 as high as you can. Make the fish gasp for air then back down a little. This is how it all hapens in Nature so it works.

Easy.

:wink2:
 

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Speaking for myself, I do not like to dose anything in excess. I give the plants exactly what they need and no more.
I also enjoy testing my tanks to insure that my fish have the best possible environment for the sake of their health, which is why I got into this hobby in the first place.
I do enjoy my plants, they are beautiful and my critters enjoy them, but my critters health is my 1st priority.
IMHO, making my critters "gasp for air" or stressing them out needlessly is unexceptable to me. I chose them, they did not choose me, so I want to give them the best life I possibly can. Yes, I could go sniff some glue, but I choose not to because it bad for my health...lol. Why would I put my critters through things that are bad for them? They have no choice in the matter and they can't just swim away to a better home. I am their keeper and I choose to do it to the best of my ability for them. You know the saying, "do no harm". I try very hard not to.
Anyway...Potassium is one of the most important elements, so why not test for it, instead of guessing? I know that testing with some kits will only give a close estimate, but I find it is better to get close than blindly dosing, hoping I am close. I am not a mathematician, so testing is my best option.
Most Reefers test religiously for what they are adding to their tanks. Freshwater tank are investments too, so why not test?
I am blessed to have the time and money to test my tanks and I would also love to know what potassium test kit is good for freshwater, instead of a question being brushed aside with "it is not needed or necessary" or having to explaining the reasons why we would like to test.
So, with this said, is there a good freshwater potassium test kit that fresh water aquarist can use, if they chose to? Or is there a reef kit that can be "tweaked" for freshwater?
If you have any experiences with potassium testing, I would enjoy your thoughts, expertise, time and help.
Have a great day and I look forward to helpful replies.
 

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I have yet to see a good test kit for potassium. The problem with cheap test kits is the accuracy of the results. No point buying and using a test that you can't trust.

I think the reason that not a lot of people test for potassium is that it seems to be abundant in the water and in the fertilizers that we use. Based on my experience, as long as regular dosing of fertilizers with potassium is being added to the tank, the K levels actually increase over time. I've also seen different ranges of K in planted tanks and I think as long as you are above 5-10 ppm which is usually the case when dosing KNO3 and KH2PO4 then K will be available. I've had tanks with 60 ppm+, 30 ppm+. I don't think I have ever seen no or zero K levels in any water that I've tested.

FYI I use a photometer (Hanna HI-83200) for testing potassium levels in my 4 tanks.
 
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