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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my current co2 regulator is setup as shown in picture below.
i would like to pipe in a bubble counter (instead of using it inline), could someone help with what fitting/elbow/bubble counter i would need to get? where do you usually buy fittings for your co2 build?
thanks.
 

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where you get this parker NML metering valve from ? The lower range of it is flow control is a little bit too high...

here is the solution, see picture, the piece is swagelok 1/4 compression tube to 1/8 male npt elbow, and you may or may not need the 1/4 od tube connector in between.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
it was built for me by a member here a couple of years back. I have not used it for a while.
can you point me to where I can get the parts exactly as shown in your picture? it looks like it would work perfectly for my setup if i buy that and replace what i currently have.
 

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swagelok part number are:

1/4 compression port to 1/8 male npt elbow, SS-400-2-2
1/4 OD tube, port connector, SS-401-PC
you can find them on ebay, and duo-lok or Parker all have the similar fittings, dig a little bit you may lower the cost.


BTW, the solenoid valve manifold on your co2 system is reversed, the two mounted holes side is the outlet, need to change it back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bettatail,
it turns out that you are right about my needle valve, it is bad. at its off position, air still leaks out on the output side of it (using soap test). could you help suggest me a replacement needle valve and where to get it?
thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
where you get this parker NML metering valve from ? The lower range of it is flow control is a little bit too high...

here is the solution, see picture, the piece is swagelok 1/4 compression tube to 1/8 male npt elbow, and you may or may not need the 1/4 od tube connector in between.

Bettatail,
it turns out that you are right about my needle valve, it is bad. at its off position, air still leaks out on the output side of it (using soap test). could you help suggest me a replacement needle valve and where to get it?
thank you.
 

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not necessary to get a replacement, you can adjust the needle stem, to lower the minimum flow control range.
but don't over do it, this metering valve is not a shut off valve, you can't use it to cut off the flow completely.

up the output pressure on the regulator to 50 psi, and follow the steps below, adjust the position of the needle stem until you still have really slow bubbles coming out of the outlet is good enough, to avoid damaging the needle stem.

----The Parker M series has a manufacture preset lower flow control threshold that might be a little bit high for our application, so sometimes need to adjust the needle position to lower the flow rate.

first, gently tighten/close the valve handle,
second, use an allen key to turn loose the retaining screw on the handle, pull out the handle (very) slightly, then tighten the retaining screw.
Now you can turn close the metering valve handle a little bit more--the needle stem goes into the orifice a little further, less gap between the orifice and the needle.

repeat above steps if the valve at close position(lower handle stop/touch at the valve shoulder) but the bubbles goes through still too high.

do not turn the valve to close with force, and if you adjust until the lower handle not touching the valve shoulder but stop, it is the needle inside stop at the orifice, excess force to turn it close even more will damage the needle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
not necessary to get a replacement, you can adjust the needle stem, to lower the minimum flow control range.
but don't over do it, this metering valve is not a shut off valve, you can't use it to cut off the flow completely.

up the output pressure on the regulator to 50 psi, and follow the steps below, adjust the position of the needle stem until you still have really slow bubbles coming out of the outlet is good enough, to avoid damaging the needle stem.

----The Parker M series has a manufacture preset lower flow control threshold that might be a little bit high for our application, so sometimes need to adjust the needle position to lower the flow rate.

first, gently tighten/close the valve handle,
second, use an allen key to turn loose the retaining screw on the handle, pull out the handle (very) slightly, then tighten the retaining screw.
Now you can turn close the metering valve handle a little bit more--the needle stem goes into the orifice a little further, less gap between the orifice and the needle.

repeat above steps if the valve at close position(lower handle stop/touch at the valve shoulder) but the bubbles goes through still too high.

do not turn the valve to close with force, and if you adjust until the lower handle not touching the valve shoulder but stop, it is the needle inside stop at the orifice, excess force to turn it close even more will damage the needle.
my assumption has been off on this valve being able to cut off the flow completely then. at it's lowest setting, it produces about 1 bubble every 4 seconds, which is fine for my application as I am running a 6-way split behind it. thanks for helping.
 
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