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Hi everyone,
So for a while now my tank has been this gross green colour and i have no clue what it is or how to get rid of it, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
p.s the glass is also going cloudy
Tank Details:
i have tried doing 50% water changes every other week, as well as 25% changes every week and also cleaning the filter every week (because it gets reallllllly dirty)
Size: 40L (10.6 Gallons)
pH: approximately 7
Other parameters unknown as i cannot afford a test kit
Filter is an Aqua One Nanoflow
Tank Friends: 2 mystery snails, bunch of red cherry shrimp, 2 x glass bloodfin tetra, 4 x neon tetras
2 air pumps are going because i also had troubles with oxygen but this has helped.
Thank you so much, I've had this tank for about 4 years and this has never happened before.
 

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As a suggestion, going forward I really suggest if you are involved with a planted aquarium with shrimp (especially shrimp) among other fish to budget for a basic test kit that can at least measure pH, Ammonia, and Nitrate level. In time as funds become available, later consider KH/GH, Copper and Phosphate test kits too. Shrimp can be quite sensitive to drastic water chemistry changes. I have a low-tech planted 30 gal tank and have never had the need to perform more than a 18% partial water change once per week and earlier if I overfed during the week, may have done a 2nd 10-12% partial water change mid week. I measure pH daily and KH, GH, Ammonia and Nitrate levels twice per week.

My experiences do not justify performing large % water changes at one time (which I do see several people mention on posts) which one should consider may negatively impact the established bio film that coat fish scales and can keep them healthier. If one finds the Ammonia and Nitrate levels are high, this can mean the fish and shrimp may be getting overfed in addition for the need to do more frequent partial water changes of lesser % each time. This helps remove Ammonia and Nitrate levels but helps maintain the biological ecosystem.


Just fyi for consideration.
 
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