The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a heavily planted 55g. (Pressurized CO2, PMDD, 260w CF). The tank is doing very well, but I'm having trouble keeping two of my plants rooted in the substrate. Cabomba furcata and Hydrocotyle leucocephala grow well, but keep getting uprooted. I've tried to plant bunches in a tiny clay pot, I've used lead weights, trued planting directly in the substrate -- but sooner or later they come loose.

Other plants like Sagittaria platyphylla, Nymphaea lotus, and various Cryptocoryne grow great root systems. None of my fish dig around in the substrate very much. The clown loaches are probably the worst and they mainly wiggle around in the plants.

Are the cambomba and hydrocotyle just hard to root, or am I missing something?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
933 Posts
Could you maybe after planting, bend it over a bit and lay a rock on the base until the roots have time to take hold?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Hydrocotyle is really more of a floating plant. It'll stay for a little while but will never grow strong roots that will hold on to anything.

I've never seen a strong root system on cabomba either.

It doesn't take much more then a fish swimming through the plant a few times to get uprooted. Either use them as floaters or try to wrap the Hydrocotyle around some manazite branches and train it to grow around it like a vine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the ideas and information. For whatever the reason, I hadn't thought of either the rock or wood approaches.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,602 Posts
Both should root just fine if happy. Cabomba will sent out long, thin, white roots eventually, but sometimes that can take a while. My experience with hydrocotyle is that it WILL root. I've never had a problem doing so. Plant it like you do any other stem plant. It may be that your clown loaches are enjoying digging them up. You might try a weight wrapped around the bottom of the stem, to keep it from coming up as easily.
 

·
Returning. Videotapes.
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
I agree with ringram....my cabomba and hydrocotyles always had nice root balls, even when I had fish that pestered them. I think that the trick, for me at least, was to plant in bunches of about 5-7 stems of cabomba, and 10 stems of hydrocotyle until they rooted well. Their roots will intertwine together, and make it virtually impossible to uproot. When the roots have grown long enough, then you can thin the groups out into 3-4 stems and replant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,461 Posts
Some substrate has less grabbing quality than the others. Those loose, light porous substrate are the worst in holding plants, while the more heavy ones like silica sand holds better. If your substrate happens to be the light one, then good luck on planting.

My old trick is to wrap thinly the base of plant with some filter floss material. This acts as prostetic root, increasing drag as well as surface contact with substrate thus helping the plant to hang on until they grow thier own root.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top