The Planted Tank Forum banner

Plants that live submerged and emerged?

4096 18
There's 1 1/4" of space between the surface and glass lid of one of my tanks, with a piece of driftwood sticking out the top. Is there any plant I can attach to the emerged part of the driftwood? Something that would be alright growing along the surface or down into the water? It couldn't be something tall since the height is limited, so likely a low carpeting plant. So far I've considered Hydrocotyle tripartita. Are there any other plants that would work on the top of a low-tech tank? GH is kept to around 8.4.
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
Any Anubias or Bucephelandra will work. Many Cryptocoryne will also work, and I'd recommend making a hole in the wood to plant it in. Hydrocotyle, any variety really, is a good option. I like tripartita 'Japan' because it is smaller than others.

You can also do many mosses like Fissidens (fontanus or fox fold over nicely) or Flame.
 

·
Carpe Diem
Joined
·
7,566 Posts
Plus mosses, baby tears, most carpetting plants. Might not be enough space for rotalas and ludwigia and hygrophila, most of which readily go emersed. Long root floaters like Amazon Frogbit and water lettuce are good candidates also, especially as they can take extra light / heat.

A word of caution: where wood breaks the surface is the prime area for algae, especially for BBA, even more so if in direct flow and densely planted. Just something to watch out for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,340 Posts
Golden creeping jenny.

Get fiberglass window screen and epoxy and make a little soil planter that hangs off rim barely touching water. 2 layers thick and then I just epoxy some lead plant weight on back side to crimp over rim.

Then plant with pond penny you find at any garden supply this time year already in emerged growing state. Just clip off few small vines of pot, wash throughly to get any fert etc off them and plant in your little bog basket. I just use coco peat and a about 4 osmocote pellets per 1 sq in of peat.

If it’s getting good light will turn bright gold and start creeping up over aquarium rim and out into water.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
692 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·

·
Premium Member
Rank Amateur
Joined
·
1,368 Posts
it's close enough. for hydrocotyle japan, definitely no misting necessary. look at my emerged mess... never misted. That grew out from a mass underneath, but as you can see as it got further out of the tank, then, it dried out. so, probably an inch of leeway? Maybe more if tank is covered?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
692 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@ipkiss Thank you so much for the reply (and the picture!) I got a huge clump of new hydrocotyle tripartia, bigger than I realized it'd be (buy 2, get one free special!). I know there will be an adjustment period and a lot of it will die off (seems like even if I dose algaecide often and dose ferts once a week, bits of whatever plant I have are dying off and attracting algae) so I'm not gluing it to the driftwood just yet. It sounds like it might be okay to wrap it around the top of the driftwood point though, as long as it's not more than an inch above the water line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,740 Posts
For something like this, does it have to be misted often? Or does the proximity to the aquarium keep the leaves hydrated?

Photo by alexmorada, on Flickr
Hey I'm doing the same thing-growing hydro 'japan' out of water on driftwood. So far it has not needed misting-granted I planted it near the surface where wood is wet, it has not grown up past the moist area yet, but I've seen some thick mounds of this stuff growing out of peoples tanks before. IT should be fine.
I should get a photo of mine...its pretty new so not that big yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,740 Posts
No need to glue Hydrocotyle - it practically attaches to my glass. It will attach very easily to just about anything you want ;)
@AquaAurora Looks beautiful! Did you glue it to the driftwood? And if so, how long did you wait after receiving the plant to do so?

No glue used, the wood has some holes I just stuffed the plant roots through.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
Mine's not as fancy as those above, but depending on your filter, you may be able to aim to outflow over your plants, which is what's working for me.

This is just a bit of wood hooked over the open output at the back of a fluval flex. Left to right is Anubias Coffeefolia, Java moss (?), Buce sp., Java Fern, Mondo Grass, and a torn up moss ball at the back. All are growing well under the lid - I think the humidity really helps.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,740 Posts
Mine's not as fancy as those above, but depending on your filter, you may be able to aim to outflow over your plants, which is what's working for me.

This is just a bit of wood hooked over the open output at the back of a fluval flex. Left to right is Anubias Coffeefolia, Java moss (?), Buce sp., Java Fern, Mondo Grass, and a torn up moss ball at the back. All are growing well under the lid - I think the humidity really helps.

Very nice! Your coffeefolia seems happy. has a spathe about to open!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
@Ryan Mosby I had a bit of wood that naturally had a slight hook, so I managed to wedge it in and pad it with the torn up moss ball. It's stable but more balanced in position rather than permanently attached.

The current goes over the moss ball bits directly, and goes over the roots of the buce and java fern. Everything else just has its roots in the water and the moss just sort of appeared by itself - I suppose there were spores either in the water or on the wood.

Oh and as said by someone previously - it does get a fair amount of hair algae around the water line, but this is easily removed and my water lettuce roots cover it anyway.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top