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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm new to the forum so please be gentle. Any advice is appreciated.

I'm having an issue with my tank looking cloudy and this white film/ fungus/mold growing on everything. My tank is not cycled yet and it's divided into 3 sections with holes drilled in the dividers for circulation. Each section does have a sponge filter (although I'm wondering if I should change those out to a more coarser sponge) the ones in there now are on the finer side.

Tank size: 20 gallon long (divided)
Substrate: Fluval Substrate with black sand on top
I do vacuum the substrate and swirl around a bit when I do water changes.

Water Changes: Twice a week
Amount of Water changed each time: 5 gallons+/-
Water Parameters:
Ammonia: 0
Nitrites: 0
Nitrates: 0
Gh: 7 drops (?) not quite sure how to calculate this yet
Kh: 3 drops (?) not quite sure how to calculate this yet as well
Temp: 74.3
Ph: 7.8
Phosphates: .25
Fe: .1 ( I do have a picture of the test results since it was my first time testing the iron so I'm not completely confident I performed that test correctly)
Lighting: Hygger from Amazon
Lighting Timer: 3 on-3 off 3 on = Total on 7 hours*
CO2: None

I'm have my lights on a timer and they're on for 3 hours then off for 3 hours then back on for 4 hours. It gets covered with a sheet at night and uncovered in the morning before lights come on.

Arriving in the next few days is Thrive Liquid Macro & Micro fertilizer.
I did do one dose of Iron about 2 days ago (Seachem)

I'm coming up with Rhizoclonium when I attempt to google what it could be, but I have no clue if that's right or not.


Plant Water Pet supply Organism Rectangle

Plant Leaf Terrestrial plant Grass Aquatic plant

Plant Leaf Botany Flower Terrestrial plant
 

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I'd recommend removing the fungus-y stuff when doing the water changes if it bothers you too much. If your tank's cycling, it's most likely some form of biofilm (no need to go too in depth to ID it, the joys of freshwater). As the tank cycles, it will come more into balance, and the weird fungusy stuff tends to go away as it gets eaten/outcompeted.

I'm unfamiliar with GH/KH test kits, but it might be useful for the future to specify which test kit you're using, as different test kits will have different recipes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'd recommend removing the fungus-y stuff when doing the water changes if it bothers you too much. If your tank's cycling, it's most likely some form of biofilm (no need to go too in depth to ID it, the joys of freshwater). As the tank cycles, it will come more into balance, and the weird fungusy stuff tends to go away as it gets eaten/outcompeted.

I'm unfamiliar with GH/KH test kits, but it might be useful for the future to specify which test kit you're using, as different test kits will have different recipes!
Thank you so much for your help! My tank is cycling (and seems to be taking forever). I'll try not to worry about it too much and just remove what I can during water changes. I thought maybe I added too many plants at once. I appreciate you help!

I've been using the API liquid test kits. I've seen other brands mentioned but I don't know if some are more reliable than others
 

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What is this "too many plants" that you speak of? haha, I get it. But from what I understand, planting is more of a one and done kind of thing with aquariums, as opposed to stocking fish.

I think that API freshwater kits are the standard in the freshwater part of the hobby. That or none of the saltwater test kit companies want to touch freshwater...
 
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