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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We live near the Chesapeake Bay and it is a very low lying area that tends to be very swampy. This year we have had a drought but this plant grows in the ditches next to the roads and it seems to grow a little better in areas with more sun as oppossed to areas that are always shaded.

I want it to be related to S. repens which grows in similar conditions in S.A. and is also closely related to hygrophila, so take a look and see what you think.

The leaves are opposite and alternate on the stems and the stems a green (with a bit of brown) and fleshy but stiff without being woody. The plants in the photo have grow emersed to the best of my knowledge but were taken from an area that would be typically flooded all year. They also have a somewhat strong odor.

Click here for larger photos http://www.flickr.com/photos/liveview/




 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Something from Rubiaceae. Could be really unhappy Diodia virginiana.
It's definitely not D. virginiana, the leaves are not solid with only a center stem visible and it is shaped slightly rounded.

The leaves have a lot of viens and variations in color like H. polysperma but I've never seen it emersed.

What ever ir is, it likes to be really wet. I brought some home and had the roots in water within 10 minutes but this morning it had all dried up very nicely with the roots soaking.

You can't tell from the photo but the plants are in a ditch and under the dried leaves it is very wet with standing water.
 

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It could still be that; it is somewhat variable.

Around the nodes, there are what look like little cuffs with stiff hairs growing upward out of them between the leaves? Closeup of the flower?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It could still be that; it is somewhat variable.

Around the nodes, there are what look like little cuffs with stiff hairs growing upward out of them between the leaves? Closeup of the flower?
Yes, plus I did some research today and the stem is square, the viens in the leaves are longitudinal with a serrulate edge. Here's a good link for some Hygophila facts, play the video http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/191

Sorry about the photos but I was at risk of getting hit by a car!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, I know Hygrophila pretty well. And it's not that.

Look here:
http://www.southeasternflora.com/view_flora.asp?plantid=31#
No it's way different than Diodia virginiana (my photos must suck) and I thought that guys pronunciation was a little off, but the square stem was worth listening to it, Home De Pot.

I was able to save one plant here on my desk top in a little glass of aquarium water, the stem is squarish, the leaves have pronouced viens like polysperma with the same pattern, but the color is a little of with the submerged leaves being all green and the rest are variegated like in the photos.

I'm going to keep playing with it and see what happens, I really appreciate all the replies and if you come up with anything else let me know and if it turns out I have a wild supply of aquarium plants I'll make sure to keep you in the loop with a lifetime supply, but I think it might just be a marsh weed with some similarities to Hi gra pha la.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm going to plant some and see if it changes under water. So far this plant has acted very stangely so I'm fairly sure its a aqautic plant.

I have a peice in fertile aquarium water from my tank, it's a short (shot glass) glass and any leaves or stems that are under water are very strong and for a couple of days I've been turning the plant over and dipping it in the water (5-6 times per day) only to see it get very healthy. So I quit dipping it under water and the submersed leaves are doing good but the emersed leaves are starting to shrivel and die, with only a stem cutting the plant cannot get enough water to the emersed leaves, but in the ditch with a large root system the emersed growth is ok, plus these ditches are on country roads that are heavily wooded swampy areas of mostly high humidity, and these plants tend to grow in spots that get a brief moment of sunlight but are constantly wet from ground water.
 
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