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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If this questions have been asked before, I'm sorry.
Currently I have a pressurized CO2 in my 60 planed tank. I would like to purchase pH controller but I have few questions.

pH Controller will control how much CO2 will be injected to my tank. Can it have a situation where overdosing CO2 and pH won't drop enough to shutdown CO2 injection? For example, if my pH is around 7.4 and I want it to be around 6.9-7.0. Can pH Controller dump too much CO2 to kill my fish. Currently, my CO2 will cut off when the light is off.

Pleaset help.

Thanks.
 

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I currently have pressurized CO2 and a PH controller. I have never had the mentioned concern that you are asking. Once the Ph in your tank gets to the set limit that you set it for, it will cut off. Just make sure you do not have the co2 coming out full force of the canister, and you shouldn't have any problems.
 

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The system will shut down the CO2 once the pH meter registers a set value. With the stoppage of CO2 delivery the pH of course will not descend further or more accurately too high a level of CO2 won't poison the livestock.

I think what you're referring to is a tank dump. To my knowledge a solenoid/controller setup will protect you from this situation...can anybody verify?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In another word, Is there a relationship between amound O2 in water and pH?
let say right now I adjust bubble counter to 2 bubbles per second and the pH is not even lower and some fishes seem to gasping for air. If I set the pH controller at 7.0 and my current pH is 7.4, with my water parameters, it require a large amount of CO2 to lower the pH, does this amound of CO2 will cause my fishes to die? or I concerned about something not going to happen?
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the controller doesn't measure the amount of co2, only the pH. it is completely possible to stress your fish with extra co2 without altering the pH. that's why co2 addition should be done very slowly.
 

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To my best knowledge C02 rates and 02 rates are practically independent of each other. Raising CO2 levels doesn't affect O2 because you're nowhere near the maximum solubility of either in water. This holds true within the reasonable ranges present in an aquarium, of course there are limits where one affects the other...I don't know them.

What is true, is that the gill is the place where CO2 diffuses from the bloodstream into water. If the water CO2 concentration is too high there is no difference in CO2 level across the blood/water interface, thus the CO2 accumulates in the body. I guess it shouldn't be called suffocation, more like CO2 toxicity.
 
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