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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I originally posted this at the Barr Report, in response to a question.

I know that some of us have bought the eBay Parker solenoid, and that it comes with just bare spade terminals. Therefore, one has to wire up their own power lead. It's a simple process.

First, here's the solenoid
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And here's the spade terminals, ready to accept a power lead
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For this, i chose an 8 foot, 16 gauge, ungrounded power lead. You may choose longer, or shorter, for your purposes. This can be found at most hardware stores. I got mine at Lowe's for ~$4
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Here's a shot of the ends of this power lead. Strip the black and white ends, to reveal about a half inch of copper.
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These are the insulated 16 gauge spade connectors i chose. The insulated variety keeps the bare metal from showing. I picked up a pack of dozen or so for ~$2.
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...to be continued in post 2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Parker Solenoid wire-up DIY, part 2

Now, i chose to slip a couple pieces of shrink wrap down onto the stripped power leads. Then, you want to insert your stripped power leads into the spade connectors and crimp down. I would suggest you use the proper tool for stripping and crimping, which will basically make the process foolproof.
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Use a heat gun to shrink the tubing, and you have your finished product.
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It doesn't matter which terminals you attach the black and white ends too. It will work either way. Some have then wrapped the attachment point with electrical tape. I didn't feel the need, as i used insulated connectors and shrink wrap. Had i not used insulated connectors, i would've wrapped in electrical tape.

Thanks for viewing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Very nice. I used a cheaper chord and just the insulated connectors. What kind of regulator are you using?
I'm using a Linde dual stage. Not sure of the model. I got it used from a member here.
 

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thrak76,

What is your opinion of the performance of the Parker Solenoid? How does it compare with a Clippard solenoid? I assume it get rather warm, can you verify?
 

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I bought the same and wire it like how you guys did. IME, they are kind heat up a lot compared to the usual solenoids or it is just mine that gets really warm. All those heat means it is eating up a a lot of power. Who else gets the same experience aside from me and HBOSMAN?
 

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I think that wrapping with electrical tape is a bad idea. I have a bunch of power cords in the front yard to supply architechtural lighting. They are on a dawn-to-dusk timer plugged into a GFCI outlet. When it rains if there is a problem the circuit will trip.

I used to wrap the places where one cord plugged into another (standard outdoor power cord extension type plugs, like you would use for a power tool) with electrical tape. I found that this was more likely to make the circuit trip, not less. If a little bit of water gets under the electrical tape it can't get out.

If you want to make it mo betta than the shrink wrap consider some kind of epoxy coating (never tried this myself, just an idea).
 

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I bought the same and wire it like how you guys did. IME, they are kind heat up a lot compared to the usual solenoids or it is just mine that gets really warm. All those heat means it is eating up a a lot of power. Who else gets the same experience aside from me and HBOSMAN?
I've tried the Clippard, which is a 6 watt solenoid. When I had it hooked up inline (co2 tubing on both sides), the solenoid would get hot. When I connected to the regulator via brass fittings, it would get only warm. My assumption is the big ol' regulator makes a good heat sink.

I was wondering if the Parker Solenoid gets as warm or hot.
 

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I've tried the Clippard, which is a 6 watt solenoid. When I had it hooked up inline (co2 tubing on both sides), the solenoid would get hot. When I connected to the regulator via brass fittings, it would get only warm. My assumption is the big ol' regulator makes a good heat sink.

I was wondering if the Parker Solenoid gets as warm or hot.
I tried feelin some of my friends solenoid and it just feels warm. In my case its hot like it was a left out piece of metal under a hot sunny day. It is a bit colder than a car radiator and will not burn your skin though.I actually tried to sniff it to see if it is burning or not. So I actually removed it and decided to let my c02 run 24/7 instead. :frown:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thrak76,

What is your opinion of the performance of the Parker Solenoid? How does it compare with a Clippard solenoid? I assume it get rather warm, can you verify?
Well, i've not used the clippard. So i don't have a basis of comparison. It does get warm to the touch though. This solenoid is also a 6 watt model. As far as the performance... it opens when it should, and closes when it should. I've only had it in service for 3 weeks now, so no long term evaluations yet. The price is nice though. :smile:
 

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Well, i've not used the clippard. So i don't have a basis of comparison. It does get warm to the touch though. This solenoid is also a 6 watt model. As far as the performance... it opens when it should, and closes when it should. I've only had it in service for 3 weeks now, so no long term evaluations yet. The price is nice though. :smile:
Thanks for the input.
 

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Hello all first post. I'm just getting back into a planted discus tank again.

Starting right now with (5) 5" discus and one sword plant.

Is that solenoid normally open or normally closed?

I noticed ASCO just came out with

Low-Power Solenoid Valves feature .55 W power consumption

Could this work? Still so new I haven't seen a price yet.

Is there a link for the basics of a diy CO2 setup?

I recently purchased a Digital Aquatics RKL controller.

Trying to figure out if I can use the PH probe reading to turn on and

off the solenoid. At the very least I know I can turn it on and off(day/night) (timer)

I already have a tank, regulator, needle valve, and bubble counter but I

had (from years ago, just getting back into it) to always remember to turn off

manual every night.

Thanks for any help.
 

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The Parker solenoid that is pictured is normally off, and only on when power is flowing to it.

I am not familiar with the ASCO solenoid; could you provide a picture and/or specification sheet?

As for setting up your own pressurized CO2 system, there are various guides/posts out there, so do a quick search. It is pretty straight forward once you have all the parts, just connect the regulator to the tank, the solenoid to the regulator, and the needle valve to the solenoid. The bubble counter goes after the needle valve, and then you can have the tubing (with a check valve) that goes to your preferred method of CO2 diffusion/delivery (i.e. reactor or a diffuser with a ceramic disc).
 

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Thanks for the reply.

You might have seen asco solenoids they are ones with the red cap and pale

green case. The one I mention is there newest although seems to be geared

to work with setups that wouldn't need a relay. Might be kind of costly and

still hard to find. Although I need to get a seperate module for the reefkeeper

lite system I have now and setup some things for my tank before I am ready

for the CO2 system anyway. My tank is still fairly new.

ww.ascovalve.com/Common/PDFFiles/Product/LowPower_Features.pdf

(won't let me post link yet, haven't reached 5 posts)

Would be kind of nice though if a fairly common solenoid that is used is 6 watt

and these are 0.55 watt. Notice the flow (0.06 to 3.2) Cv Enough?

Thanks for any help.
 

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so a air ride valve like a parker, exterme, gc, smc would work as a c02 valve. i can get those for cheap, i might even have one laying around. thanks !
 

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I used to assemble those at Parker's hydraulic division across the bridge in otsego :) I also worked at the brass division for a while too! :) Parker makes QUALITY parts fo' sho'!
Nice! My only complaint with the Parker solenoid is that they really heat up. I do not think they were designed to be held in the open state for 8+ hours at a time for CO2 use. Other than that, they have been great!
 

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yeah I don't think the could be held open that long and last long. I do like smc and hellbent valves those. plus air valves get expensive after a while trust me i had a 88 bagged b2200, a 91 bagged b2000 , a 89 bagged and body dropped b2200 and a bagged 2000 s10. it's not fun replaces these valves when they get stuck opened or closed.
 

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These solenoids would lend themselves more to use for water changes or auto topoffs. The use of a cold water supply to these solenoids would be perfect to help cool the unit, and the small duration of time would minimize heat.

These are very similar to Asco solenoids.

I would not reccomend these for CO2 because of the heat issue, but I guess if its already being used with success, then I can't say its not possible. I would just be aware of the drawbacks being listed before selecting this as your application.

FYI, from my research so far, by the time you purchase the solenoid, fittings, wire and wire connectors, it would be almost the same price as buying a brand new clippard.
 
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